† 73-89 Shank Painter Road

73-89 Shank Painter Road, Provincetown.A plan of the Provincetown Golf Range with present-day buildings superimposed as white outlines. Covering much of the miniature golf course is the former Clem & Ursie restaurant. The Hole in One still exists, I believe, and is now Chach. 

Provincetown Golf Range | Provincetown Miniature Golf | Hole in One

73-89 Shank Painter Road, Provincetown (1959). Advertisement in The Provincetown Advocate, 11 June 1959. From Provincetown Online: The Advocate Live!, by the Provincetown Public Library.But for the Cape Cod National Seashore, Route 6 might have become home to Provincetown’s highway attractions. As it was, they gravitated to the sparsely settled Shank Painter Road: the zoo, the giant nightclub, the sprawling service station, the drive-in bank, the circus grounds, the driving range and — of course — the miniature golf course, sine qua non in the Eisenhower era. The project was the inspiration of Matthew J. “Matt” Costa (±1925-2002), who had earlier developed the Meadows Motel, 122 Bradford Street Extension, and Antone Duarte Jr. of Truro. Costa would later build the Dairyland at 85 Shank Painter Road, on the site of the miniature course.

73-89 Shank Painter Road, Provincetown (1963). Advertisement in The Provincetown Advocate, 20 June 1963. From Provincetown Online: The Advocate Live!, by the Provincetown Public Library.Costa and Duarte received a zoning variance in early 1959 to build the range, and opened it in June. A month later, they opened an 18-hole miniature golf course at the northern end of their property, where Shank Painter Road and Captain Bertie’s Way converge. The next year, they opened the Hole in One coffee shop, with Kenneth Roderick. I believe this is the building that now houses Chach. The golf range served as the setting for an Easter ham shoot by the Highland Fish and Game Club, which was Costa’s other passion. Irene Rabinowitz also remembers riding go-karts out at the range.

The Provincetown Golf Range was the setting in 1963 of a brief visit by the King Brothers Three-Ring Circus. And Daniel R. Kearney remembered that the grounds were often used as an impromptu midway. “That’s where I learned the term ‘carnie,'” he told me in 2013. “Crowded dusty lanes surrounded by hucksters, Kewpie dolls, cotton candy, dangerous mechanical rides and loud music. Carnies workin’ the crowds.” • Map ¶ Updated 2013-09-08


 

73-89 Shank Painter Road, Provincetown (1959). Advertisement in The Provincetown Advocate, 9 July 1959. From Provincetown Online: The Advocate Live!, by the Provincetown Public Library.73-89 Shank Painter Road, Provincetown (1960). Advertisement in The Provincetown Advocate, 13 October 1960. From Provincetown Online: The Advocate Live!, by the Provincetown Public Library.

 

73-89 Shank Painter Road, Provincetown (1963). Advertisement in The Provincetown Advocate, 20 June 1963. From Provincetown Online: The Advocate Live!, by the Provincetown Public Library.

 

73-89 Shank Painter Road, Provincetown (1959). Advertisement in The Provincetown Advocate, 11 June 1959. From Provincetown Online: The Advocate Live!, by the Provincetown Public Library.

 

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