1-20 Old Ann Page Way

3 Old Ann Page Way, Provincetown (2008), by David W. Dunlap. 
Old Ann Page Way, Provincetown. Map by David W. Dunlap.As “New Urbanist” subdevelopments go, Old Ann Page Way does pretty well — at least in its external design — in creating the feeling of a small neighborhood that’s grown up over time. Perhaps most successful is the three-unit complex of Nos. 5, 6 and 7, which looks as if it grew by accretion, much the way real Provincetown houses added kitchen ells and other extensions. Even unmistakably new houses like No. 3, 8 and 17 have a quirky appearance because there are relatively few windows on their front facades and a lot of blank wall. Again, they look almost like buildings that have been worked over several times.

But all is artifice. The 18-unit, 10-studio complex is barely one decade old. It was constructed from 2002 to 2003 by Community Housing Resource Inc., of 34-36 Conwell Street, headed by Edward “Ted” Malone (b 1954), on the site once occupied by the A&P, 32 Conwell Street.

Ann Page, a house brand of the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company.Malone paid subtle homage to the site’s origins in naming the private circle around which the houses are arranged. Ann Page was a house brand of the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company. But you’d only know that if you were as old as I am. Otherwise, it simply sounds like some old New England moniker. (There have, in fact, been Page and Paige families in town.) This is “affordable” housing, meaning that qualifying residents earn no more than 50 to 60 percent of the area median income. At Old Ann Page Way and other projects, Malone has taken advantage of the low-income housing tax credit. To do so, a developer must guarantee that a certain percentage of units will be rented to households with incomes well below the area median. The developer sells these credits to investors who use them to lower their own federal tax liability, dollar for dollar.

Though Malone has often been a controversial figure in town, it seems to this visitor that Old Ann Page Way provides an enclave for less prosperous residents that can hold its own — aesthetically — with subdevelopments that are affordable only to the very wealthy. That may not be much of an answer to Provincetown’s increasing economic stratification, but it’s no small achievement. • Assessor’s Online Database ¶ Posted 2013-05-27


1-2 Old Ann Page Way
 

1-2 Old Ann Page Way, Provincetown (2012), by David W. Dunlap.

 


2 Old Ann Page Way
 

1-2 Old Ann Page Way, Provincetown (2012), by David W. Dunlap.

 


3 Old Ann Page Way
 

3 Old Ann Page Way, Provincetown (2012), by David W. Dunlap.

 


4 Old Ann Page Way
 

4 Old Ann Page Way, Provincetown (2012), by David W. Dunlap.

 


5 Old Ann Page Way
 

5 Old Ann Page Way, Provincetown (2012), by David W. Dunlap.

 


6 Old Ann Page Way
 

6 Old Ann Page Way, Provincetown (2012), by David W. Dunlap.

 


7 Old Ann Page Way
 

7 Old Ann Page Way, Provincetown (2012), by David W. Dunlap.

 


8 Old Ann Page Way
 

8 Old Ann Page Way, Provincetown (2012), by David W. Dunlap.

 


9-10 Old Ann Page Way
 

9 Old Ann Page Way, Provincetown (2012), by David W. Dunlap.

 

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