6 Pearl Street

6 Pearl Street, Provincetown (2012), by David W. Dunlap. 
Edward "Ted" Chapin, 6B Pearl Street, Provincetown (2012), by David W. Dunlap.“I just think of myself as part of this continuum, starting with this little fish shack,” Edward (Ted) Chapin (b 1950) said in 2003, after his renovation of 6 Pearl Street changed the building envelope significantly for the fourth time in its 120-year history. Chapin explained to Life in Provincetown magazine that the building had begun as a gable-roofed fish shack. In the first big change, a kitchen angle expanded the house. The second big change was the addition of a gambrel roof. The third big change came with the construction of a porch. His renovation, however, was the most dramatic. “Basically, the only constraints were the three antique walls and the shape,” he said. “Everything else is completely reconceived.” The extra floor area that Chapin added to 6 Pearl was subtracted from the workshop and garage at 6B Pearl that he and his partner, Torrence C. Boone, also purchased in 2000 from the Souza family.

6 Pearl Street, Provincetown (2012), by David W. Dunlap.

 

Capt. Antone C. Souza (b ±1886), a fisherman, skippered a number of boats; most — or all — of which were named Shamrock. That didn’t seem an especially lucky appellation for Captain Souza. Shamrock III ran aground in the fall of 1953, and was a complete loss. Shamrock IV, a 32-foot trawler, blew up in June 1954 at Monument Wharf (predecessor to Fisherman’s Wharf) just after unloading 800 pounds of mackerel, when the engine was started while the cabin was full of fumes. Souza and his mate, Antone Santos, escaped serious injury. Souza was living here in the early 1960s with Joaquina G. Souza (b ±1895), his wife [?], and their son [?], Anthony J. Souza (b 1915), a carpenter. In 1965, his little gasoline dory was caught up in an ice flow and carried off to Truro. You probably can guess the name of the boat.

Chapin and Boone bought the property from the Souza family and set out to transform it. “I think it’s important that a good chunk of the quality of the exterior of these antique buildings stay preserved,” Chapin told Life in Provincetown, “but there’s nothing wrong with enhancing them, if it’s done tastefully. … Little bits of modernity woven into some of the old fabric are fine.” • Historic District SurveyAssessor’s Online Database ¶ Posted 2013-06-01


 

6 Pearl Street, Provincetown (ND). Courtesy of Ted Chapin.

 

6 Pearl Street, Provincetown (2012), by David W. Dunlap.

 

6 Pearl Street, Provincetown (2012)-06

 

6 Pearl Street, Provincetown (2012), by David W. Dunlap.

 

6 Pearl Street, Provincetown (2012)-08

 

6 Pearl Street, Provincetown (2012), by David W. Dunlap.

 

6 Pearl Street, Provincetown (2012)-10

 

6 Pearl Street, Provincetown (2012), by David W. Dunlap.

 

One thought on “6 Pearl Street

  1. I have always loved this house and make a point of walking up Pearl Street each time I visit Provincetown to see it and envy the inhabitants a little!

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