14 Howland Street

Painting by Nancy (Whorf) Kelly, from the Seamen's Bank, by David W. Dunlap.

Painting by Nancy (Whorf) Kelly, from the Seamen’s Bank, by David W. Dunlap.

14 Howland Street, by David W. Dunlap (2012).

14 Howland Street, by David W. Dunlap (2012).

When Nancy (Whorf) Kelly died in 2009 after Romanos Rizk, Sue Harrison of The Banner said it was “as if two of the brightest stars just disappeared from the sky.” Nancy Whorf centered much of her life around No. 14, where she raised her daughters Julia Whorf Kelly, Lydia Pratt, and Megan Nelson. In the memoir Feast or Famine: Growing Up Bohemian in Provincetown, Julia wrote, “Always inviting, never quiet, seldom still, the house was in itself alive.” Nancy was the daughter of the painter John Whorf, sister of the painter Carol (Whorf) Westcott, and companion of the artist Herman Tasha. You’ve seen her vibrant paintings of Provincetown on the walls of Adams, the Mayflower Café, Seamen’s Bank (one of its Whorfs is pictured above), and in the gallery of Berta Walker, who said Whorf was to Provincetown what van Gogh was to Arles. The house has been altered since her death.


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s