321 Commercial Street

321 Commercial Street, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

321 Commercial Street, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

Joy and Timothy McNulty, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

Joy and Timothy McNulty, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

Shawn McNulty, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

Shawn McNulty, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

The defining aesthetic feature of the Lobster Pot is something that should be anathema in the historic district: a blazing neon sign. But what would downtown be without it? Ralph and Adeline (Santos) Medeiros opened the place in 1943. After he died, she married Richard LaFrance. They sold the business in 1979 to Joy McNulty. Son Timothy is the executive chef. Son Shawn is the front-of-the-house manager. The moment you enter, you’re in a production line: lobster tanks, pantry, lobster station, first and second grill stations, fry station, and first and second sauté stations. At peak, some 800 dinners are prepared and served here daily by about 100 employees. This could be oppressive. Yet the McNultys make the Lobster Pot feel happily informal, converting chaos into kinetic energy.


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.

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