465A Commercial Street

465A Commercial Street, attending a Beachcombers dinner for the actor Edward Everett Horton in 1946 were Jere Snader, in striped shirt, facing the camera over his shoulder, and clockwise from him Rabbi Samuel L. Therman, of St. Louis; George Palmer, stage manager for Horton; Dr. Frederick S. Hammett; Harry Kemp; Vollian Burr Rann (standing); Ted Robinson of The Cleveland Plain dealer (in three-piece suit); Don Witherstine; Horton; Bruce McKain; and Elmer Greensfelder, courtesy of the Provincetown History Preservation Project.

465A Commercial Street, attending a Beachcombers dinner for the actor Edward Everett Horton in 1946 were Jere Snader, in striped shirt, facing the camera over his shoulder, and clockwise from him Rabbi Samuel L. Therman, of St. Louis; George Palmer, stage manager for Horton; Dr. Frederick S. Hammett; Harry Kemp; Vollian Burr Rann (standing); Ted Robinson of The Cleveland Plain dealer (in three-piece suit); Don Witherstine; Horton; Bruce McKain; and Elmer Greensfelder, courtesy of the Provincetown History Preservation Project.

You could easily pass the “Hulk” without realizing that it’s a locus of power, influence, and camaraderie. Beachcombers are fine with that. The 99-year-old group, founded as something like the social arm of the Art Association, keeps a low profile. Born at Cesco’s Restaurant, the Beachcombers bought the Hulk, a pier shed on Knowles’s Wharf, in 1917. Ten years later, a storm so shook the Hulk that the members moved it to the foot of Bangs Street. They rented it in the ’30s to the Ship nightclub and Flagship restaurant. The sculptor William Boogar Jr. set up a foundry in 1933 in what had been Clarence Snow’s abutting smithy. Like almost every prominent artist of his era, Boogar was a Beachcomber. The photo depicts a visit in 1946 by the actor Edward Everett Horton, third from right.

465A Commercial Street, the Beachcombers, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

465A Commercial Street, the Beachcombers, by David W. Dunlap (2010).


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.

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