26 Alden Street

26 Alden Street, the Grace Gouveia Building, by David W. Dunlap (2012).

26 Alden Street, the Grace Gouveia Building, by David W. Dunlap (2012).

Grace Gouveia, by Jay Critchley.

Grace Gouveia, by Jay Critchley.

In a town whose economy turned on the luck of the fishery, poverty was often no farther away than one capsized boat or a couple of empty nets. By 1870, there were so many poor people that Provincetown constructed this large Alms House, also known as the Town Asylum, to shelter them. In 1956, it was transformed into a municipal nursing home called Cape End Manor, which was housed here until a new facility was built at 100 Alden. The asylum was converted into town offices and renamed the Grace Gouveia Building, in honor of Grace Gouveia. This beloved teacher, poet, and social activist immigrated from Portugal in 1915, at the age of 6. She died in 1998.


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.

100 Alden Street

100 Alden Street, Seashore Point, by David W. Dunlap (2012).

100 Alden Street, Seashore Point, by David W. Dunlap (2012).

100 Alden Street, Cape End Manor, now demolished, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

100 Alden Street, Cape End Manor, now demolished, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

The official name for this “concierge condominium” complex is Seashore Point. But you’ll often hear it called the Manor — “She’s up at the Manor these days, God love her” — since it supplanted and eventually replaced the Cape End Manor, a municipal nursing home that was built on this site in 1980 to replace the facility at 26 Alden. In 2006, management was transferred from the town to Deaconess Abundant Life Communities and ground was broken on the first 43 units of Seashore Point, designed by EGA Architects. The first residents, Dr. Richard and Barbara Keating of Truro, arrived in 2008. The final 38 units were completed in 2014.

124 Alden Street

124 Alden Street, the Calvary group in the Cemetery of St. Peter the Apostle, by David W. Dunlap (2012).

124 Alden Street, the Calvary group in the Cemetery of St. Peter the Apostle, by David W. Dunlap (2012).

Catholicism and Portuguese national identity are closely tied together at the Cape end, as even the briefest stroll through the 12-acre Cemetery of the Church of St. Peter the Apostle will reveal, on headstones carved with names like Avellar, Cabral, Cordeiro, Corea, Costa, Duarte, Dutra, Ferreira, Flores, Lopes, Macara, Santos, Silva, Souza, and Taves. The land was acquired in 1869, even before the church was built. It is owned by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Fall River. Renovations of the cemetery were begun in 1952, during the pastorate of Msgr. Leo Duart, who also bequeathed money for the construction of the cemetery chapel, which opened in 1976. The sculptural scene of Calvary (pictured) was donated by the Rev. Manuel Terra.

2-2A Allerton Street

2 Allerton Street, pictured in "The House That Is, or a Tale of the Ship's Bell."

2 Allerton Street, pictured in “The House That Is, or a Tale of the Ship’s Bell.”

Mary DeAngelis and Marian Roth, courtesy of Marian Roth.

Mary DeAngelis and Marian Roth, courtesy of Marian Roth.

Barbara E. Cohen, by David W. Dunlap (2012).

Barbara E. Cohen, by David W. Dunlap (2012).

Built around 1800 on Commercial Street, the house was moved to this site and opened in the late 1920s as the Ship’s Bell (“because of the gladness that was ringing in our hearts”) by Eleanor Bloomfield and Mary “Ivy” Ivins. They called themselves “independent women.” Contemporary eyes might see the Ship’s Bell as the town’s first lesbian-owned guest house. It was later owned by Charles Hapgood, author of The Earth’s Shifting Crust, and his wife, Tamsin (Hughes) Hapgood, a real estate agent. Their son, William Hapgood, an inventor and musician, sold it in 2001 to the artist and photographer Marian Roth, and the clothing designer Mary DeAngelis. Hapgood owns the garage, No. 2A, whose attic apartment shelters the artist Barbara E. Cohen.

3 Allerton Street

3 Allerton Street, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

3 Allerton Street, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

Daniel Towler, by David W. Dunlap (2013).

Daniel Towler, by David W. Dunlap (2013).

James Thomas, a member of the Bonedome Construction Company, who ferried people and supplies to the dune shacks in a specially modified Model A Ford (that was how he met the artist Edith Hughes, who was to become his wife), built this house and three-car garage in 1938. Their daughter, Michal (Thomas) Barnes, lives in Ohio but still owns this property. Daniel Towler, one of the town’s more informed and passionate historians, has lived here since 1995. Edith’s backyard studio has been used by the potter Debbi Kahn, the sculptor Paul Bowen, and the painter Bert Yarborough. In recent years, the painter Alyssa Schmidt sold miniature landscapes from a roadside stand here, on the honor system.

5 Allerton Street

5 Allerton Street, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

5 Allerton Street, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

Roger Rilleau, courtesy of Gaby Rilleau (1948).

Roger Rilleau, courtesy of Gaby Rilleau (1948).

Peggy and Kim Rilleau, courtesy of Gaby Rilleau (1952).

Peggy and Kim Rilleau, courtesy of Gaby Rilleau (1952).

Kim Rilleau, courtesy of Gaby Rilleau.

Kim Rilleau, courtesy of Gaby Rilleau.

The Rilleau Sandal Shop was founded in 1940 by Roger Rilleau as Hand Industries, at 322 Commercial. It moved to 347 Commercial, then to this property, which had been known to generations of postcard buyers as the Rose-Covered Cottage, said Gaby Rilleau. Kim Rilleau, son of Roger and Peggy (Tryon) Rilleau, conducted the business in a workshop here from 1968 to 1997. It was “cluttered with dyes, driftwood, sculpture, whale bones and dusty shelves filled with hand tools,” Sue Harrison wrote in The Banner, and carried “the deep, rich smell of leather that new cars can only aspire to.” It was more recently Pat McCobb’s Allerton Custom Picture Framing business.

6 Anthony Street

Mira, Resia, and Naomi Schor, courtesy of Mira Schor (1970).

Mira, Resia, and Naomi Schor, courtesy of Mira Schor (1970).

In 1969, Resia Schor, an artist herself and the widow of the artist Ilya Schor, bought this house, which was constructed around 1800, for her and her daughters Naomi and Mira Schor. She called it Ça Me Suffit — “It is enough for me.” Resia worked in the oldest part of the house, a former fish shack, making jewelry and sculpture. Mira painted upstairs in a small room with seashell-patterned wallpaper from the ’50s. Naomi, a noted scholar who died in 2001, worked in an upstairs room with a bay view. After Resia died in 2006, Mira began drawing in her mother’s studio, which she said “proved to be an engine for new work.” Resia and Ilya are buried in Town Cemetery, under a strikingly Modernist tombstone.

21 Atkins-Mayo Road

21 Atkins-Mayor Road, by David W. Dunlap (2013).

21 Atkins-Mayor Road, by David W. Dunlap (2013).

Romolo Del Deo, by David W. Dunlap (2013).

Romolo Del Deo, by David W. Dunlap (2013).

This is the home and studio of the sculptor and graphic artist Romolo Del Deo, whose Fishermen’s Memorial is intended for MacMillan Wharf, once the needed money is raised. His mother, Josephine (Couch) Del Deo, told me this house was probably built soon after the parcel was acquired in 1915 by Col. Francis Bacon Jones, who fought in the Civil War. His children were the artist Mary Bacon Jones, an important member of the Provincetown color woodblock group, and Russell Jones, who sold the property in 1928 to his brother-in-law, Shorb Floyd Jones. Josephine and Sal Del Deo, and Josephine’s mother, Osma Gallinger Tod, bought it in 1971. Romolo studied in Florence, Carrara, and Pietrasanta, and counts Dimitri Hadzi among his teachers. He’s owned this property since 1992.

31 Atkins-Mayo Road

Sal Del Deo in his studio, an out building at 31 Atkins-Mayo Road, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

Sal Del Deo in his studio, an out building at 31 Atkins-Mayo Road, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

The artist and restaurateur Salvatore Del Deo — namesake of both Ciro & Sal’s and Sal’s Place — has owned this property since 1955 with his wife, Josephine (Couch) Del Deo. She is the town historian emerita; a moving force behind the Cape Cod National Seashore, the Historic District, and the former Heritage Museum, and the author of Figures in a Landscape, a biography of Ross Moffett; and Compass Grass Anthology. In 1953, she married Sal, who had attended the Art Students League and the Vesper George School of Art in Boston before coming to town to study with Henry Hensche. His studio is a freestanding building out back. To design it, Del Deo told me, he measured the dimensions of studios used by Moffett, Philip Malicoat, Pauline Palmer, Max Bohm, Frederick Waugh, and Charles Hawthorne. The main house was originally the studio of Mary Bacon Jones.

Sal and Josephine Del Deo at home, 31 Atkins-Mayo Road, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

Sal and Josephine Del Deo at home, 31 Atkins-Mayo Road, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

56 Atkins-Mayo Road

56 Atkins-Mayo Road, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

56 Atkins-Mayo Road, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

This stout, angular box of a studio was built in the 1950s for Boris Margo, a Ukrainian native who emigrated to the United States in 1930 and married the artist Jan Gelb. They spent summers in a dune shack that still bears their names. “Margo pioneered new materials and techniques to create his biomorphic and lyrically abstract work,” Pamela Mandell wrote in On Equal Ground. In 1971, squatters started a fire that burned the studio down, though firemen did all they could to save the artwork. Margo and his nephew Murray Zimiles rebuilt in 1973. Since Margo’s death in 1995, the studio has been used by Zimiles and his niece, Dawn Zimiles, a painter and mixed-media artist.

8 Atwood Avenue

8 Atwood Avenue, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

8 Atwood Avenue, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

When you spot a white-on-blue plaque of a house aboard a scow — as there is on this lovely three-quarter Cape — you’re in the presence of a building that was floated over from Long Point, an early 19th-century settlement on the thin finger of land separating Cape Cod Bay from Provincetown Harbor. By the late 1860s, as the near-shore fishery grew depleted, the settlement had to be abandoned. Almost 40 structures were salvaged, however, and floated over to town as the plaque suggests, including this one and two nearby, at 10 and 12 Atwood.

10 Atwood Avenue

10 Atwood Avenue, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

10 Atwood Avenue, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

Clustered around Atwood Avenue and Point Street are many of the Long Point floaters whose historical provenance seems most solid. At the heart of the property at No. 10 is a house that was believed to have belonged to Joseph Butler when it stood out at the point, somewhat in the center of the settlement. By the 1860s, it had been moved across the harbor. In 1862, it became the home of the newly wedded Adelia (Morgan) Atwood and Stephen Atwood. Her great love was the Centenary Methodist Church, where she sang in the choir. Joseph Collins and Harry Clark of San Francisco bought the house in 1999 and undertook a renovation that preserved a lot of the distinctive architectural features that had grown by accretion over the decades.

3 Aunt Sukey’s Way

3 Aunt Sukey's Way, Jack Kearney's studio and workshop, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

3 Aunt Sukey’s Way, Jack Kearney’s studio and workshop, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

Jack Kearney of Chicago, who trained at the Cranbrook Academy of Art and in Italy, was a sculptor in the classical medium of bronze and the less classical medium of automobile parts. This was his studio and fabrication plant, on property he purchased in 1984. “Kearney has welded the curved ends of chrome car bumpers into the organic shapes of such beasts as the bison, Siberian tiger, snowy egret and white rhinoceros,” Christopher Busa wrote in Provincetown Arts. Among the works cast here were characters from The Wizard of Oz, for Oz Park in Chicago. When a girl spotted the newly finished Tin Man, she admonished the sculptor that he’d forgotten the heart. Kearney told her father to bring her back the next day, by which time he’d given Tin Man a heart of stainless steel. A man of great heart himself, Kearney died in 2014.

1 Baker Avenue

1 Baker Avenue, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

1 Baker Avenue, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

Ryan Landry, by Sue Harrison (2014).

Ryan Landry, by Sue Harrison (2014).

A picturesque exemplar of the Cape Cod house (in this case a three-quarter Cape with Greek Revival flourishes, built around 1830), 1 Baker further profits from its situation, roughly perpendicular to Pearl Street, which sets it off charmingly. A century and more ago, this was home to the Baker family. Since 2010, it has been owned by Ryan Landry, the indefatigable impresario behind the popular Showgirls revue and shepherd of the Gold Dust Orphans troupe, whose productions have included Mildred Fierce, Pornocchio, Mary Poppers, Valet of the Dolls, and Silent Night of the Lambs.

2 Baker Avenue

2 Baker Avenue, circular cellar, by David W. Dunlap (2012).

2 Baker Avenue, circular cellar, by David W. Dunlap (2012).

Claire Sprague, by David W. Dunlap (2012).

Claire Sprague, by David W. Dunlap (2012).

Once known as 9B Pearl Street, this house was constructed in the early 19th century. Like many older buildings, it has a circular cellar whose shape buttresses the wall against the pressure of surrounding sand. The property was purchased in 1994 by Claire Sprague, the host and co-creator with Ann Lane of Sister Talk on WOMR-FM, a program focusing on gender issues that was broadcast for 17 years, until 2009. Sprague co-curated, with Irma Ruckstuhl, “The Jeweler’s Art: Four Provincetown Silversmiths, 1940s-1960s,” a 2003 exhibition at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum, and was co-executor of the Lillian Orlowsky and William Freed estate. After she sold this property in 2012, her secret little pathway down to Pearl Street was closed off.

11 Bangs Street

11 Bangs Street, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

11 Bangs Street, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

"S-6-74," by Nassos Daphnis (1974), courtesy of the Provincetown Art Association and Museum.

“S-6-74,” by Nassos Daphnis (1974), courtesy of the Provincetown Art Association and Museum.

In 1953, almost a quarter century after arriving in this country from Greece, the artist and horticulturalist Nassos Daphnis came to Provincetown. Among the artists he met was Helen Avlonitis, a student of Robert Motherwell. They were wed in 1956 and bought this house, then roughly a century old, in 1958. A year later, the gallerist Leo Castelli in New York gave Daphnis a one-man show that “established him as a leading exponent of geometric abstraction,” The New York Times said in his 2010 obituary. Besides painting, Helen Daphnis-Avlon operated the Avlon Sun Gallery in the 1980s. She died in 2004.

76R Bayberry Avenue

76R Bayberry Avenue, entrance to Coastal Acres Camping Court, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

76R Bayberry Avenue, entrance to Coastal Acres Camping Court, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

F/V Silver Mink, by David Jarrett (1982).

F/V Silver Mink, by David Jarrett (1982).

“In the Shelter of Cape Cod’s Sandy Arm — Your Port o’ Call.” The motto of the Coastal Acres Camping Court has the pleasingly anachronistic ring of a place that’s endured the changing fashions of Cape-end vacation styles. It was developed by Capt. Manny Phillips, a towering figure of the fishery. His purse seiner, Silver Mink, brought in a record 250,000 pounds of tuna one day in 1959. Captain Phillips opened the 15-acre campsite in 1967 and sold Silver Mink. His son-in-law, Richard Perry, took over Coastal Acres, which is still family-run. Open-space advocates say the property, now more than 23 acres, is the largest undeveloped parcel in town.

Update | “Jamie Veara, a spokesperson for the trust that owns the Coastal Acres campground in the West End, told The Banner on Tuesday morning that the property is under contract. The transaction involves two parcels on a 22-plus-acre site, which had been listed at $4.5 million.” — The Provincetown Banner, 15 October 2015.


Consult the documents or view the images

5 Bradford Street Extension

5 Bradford Street Extension, the Moors, courtesy of the Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum.

5 Bradford Street Extension, the Moors, courtesy of the Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum.

Mylan Costa, courtesy of The Provincetown Banner.

Mylan Costa, courtesy of The Provincetown Banner.

Kind of cheesy but utterly beloved, the Moors was as much a town institution as a tourist destination. Maline Costa opened it in 1939. It burned in 1956 and was rebuilt in a month, filled with curios and memorabilia from neighbors and fishermen. You could get a drink in the Smugglers Jug Room or dine on Portuguese fare — “Combed from the Sea” — in the Old Shed. The Moors was a landmark on the gay social circuit for beachgoers returning from Herring Cove. Mylan Costa, Maline’s son, sold it in 1998. John and Kim Medeiros ran it for a while but it was demolished and replaced in 2004 by the Village at the Moors. The nearby motel of the same name now does business as the Inn at the Moors.

21 Bradford Street Extension

21 Bradford Street Extension, Herring Cove Village, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

21 Bradford Street Extension, Herring Cove Village, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

21 Bradford Street Extension, Herring Cove Tennis Club office, now demolished, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

21 Bradford Street Extension, Herring Cove Tennis Club office, now demolished, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

The Herring Cove Tennis Club, with five red-clay courts, was built in 1947 by Hawthorne Bissell and known for many years as Bissell’s Tennis Courts or the Cast Anchor Tennis Courts. This being Provincetown, the courts were also used in the late 1950s for John Kelly’s classes in Russian ballet. The four-acre property was acquired in 2006 by the developers Jim Watkins and Dave Krohn. In 2008, they began opening units of the Herring Cove Village condominium complex. The houses, by McMahon Architects, are punctuated by ersatz widow’s-walk cupolas. The landscape design is by David Berarducci. With the completion of the second phase in 2014, only two courts remain. The tennis building is gone.

29 Bradford Street Extension

29 Bradford Street Extension, Bill White's Motel, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

29 Bradford Street Extension, Bill White’s Motel, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

Bradford Street Extension was once motel alley. Bill White’s Motel was built in 1975 by William and Margaret White, who ran the place until John and Margaret Tinkham (Margaret White’s daughter) took over in 1994. The Explorer’s Guide said in 2003 that the 12-unit motel provided “arguably the best value in town” and that “the Portuguese hospitality is warm.” The property was acquired by John Gagliardi, who had previously operated the Copper Fox, and reopened in 2010 as the Foxberry Inn. White was a postman who had gone into the home-building business, Gagliardi told me, and did a “wonderful job” constructing the namesake motel himself.

105 Bradford Street Extension

105 Bradford Street Extension, the Chateau Provincetown, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

105 Bradford Street Extension, the Chateau Provincetown, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

Sprawled over a four-acre hilltop site, the sheer size of the 55-room Seaglass Inn and Spa — known previously as the Chateau Motel, Best Western Chateau Motor Inn and Chateau Provincetown — is unlike anything in town. Two generations of the Gordon family were involved: William and Emily (Prada) Gordon opened the motel in 1958 and expanded it. They were followed by their son, William Gordon Jr., and his wife, Charlotte. The Gordons proposed tearing down the motel in 2007 and converting the property into a 10-lot subdivision, but kept the Chateau ouvert until 2013, when they sold it to Nadine Licostie, a filmmaker, and her wife, Faith Licostie, an emergency-room nurse, who rechristened it Seaglass and reopened it in 2014.

144 Bradford Street Extension

144 Bradford Street Extension, the Galeforce Farm barn, courtesy of Allen Gallant.

144 Bradford Street Extension, the Galeforce Farm barn, courtesy of Allen Gallant.

144 Bradford Street Extension, Gale Force Bikes, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

144 Bradford Street Extension, Gale Force Bikes, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

Beach Market and Gale Force Bikes, a popular place to rent bicycles for the Cape Cod National Seashore trails, occupies the site of the main barn of Galeforce Farm, founded at the turn of the 20th century by Frank Silva Alves, a fisherman and native of Pico, in the Azores. In its early days, it was one of five dairy farms in town. Frank’s son, Joseph Alves, took over in 1934, installed pasteurization equipment in 1941, and increased the herd to more than three dozen Guernsey and Holstein cows. But a lack of farmhands and a spate of bad weather killed off Galeforce in 1952, by which time it was the last dairy farm at the Cape tip.

147 Bradford Street Extension

147 Bradford Avenue Extension, Galeforce Farm farmhouse, courtesy of Allen Gallant (1956).

147 Bradford Avenue Extension, Galeforce Farm farmhouse, courtesy of Allen Gallant (1956).

Raymond Alves and friends, courtesy of Allen Gallant.

Raymond Alves and friends, courtesy of Allen Gallant.

Allen Gallant, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

Allen Gallant, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

An ample farmhouse from the early 20th century still stands, and still commands a proprietor’s prospect over what was once dairy land. The main building of the Safe Harbor condominium at No. 147 was the home of Joseph Alves and Irene (Raymond) Alves, who ran Galeforce, the town’s last commercial dairy farm. Their son Raymond Alves sold the property in 1990 to his brother-in-law, Allen Gallant, who created the condo in 2005. Gallant’s husband, David Cox, is a pioneer in chronicling Provincetown from a drone’s-eye view.

175 Bradford Street Extension

175 Bradford Street Extension, Dairy Queen, courtesy of the Provincetown History Preservation Project (1987).

175 Bradford Street Extension, Dairy Queen, courtesy of the Provincetown History Preservation Project (1987).

Elmer Silva, courtesy of Provincetown High School.

Elmer Silva, courtesy of Provincetown High School.

Dairy Queen matchbook, courtesy of Salvador R. Vasques III.

Dairy Queen matchbook, courtesy of Salvador R. Vasques III.

Joe “The Barber” Ferreira opened “probably the only Dairy Queen franchise in America that served kale soup,” Amy Whorf McGuiggan wrote My Provincetown. It replaced the Wagon Wheels diner, run by Alfred “Fall River” Perry. The D.Q. was later owned by Elmer Silva, principal of Provincetown High School, who employed students like Yvonne Frazier, now a professional opera singer in Europe. It morphed into Silva’s Seafood Connection, run by Paul Silva and his brother, David Silva, a proprietor these days of the Red Inn. After turns as LiCata’s and the Beach Grill, it was razed by Victor DePoalo to make way for condos and Victor’s restaurant.

2 Bradford Street

2 Bradford Street, former Mary's Snack Bar, now demolished, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

2 Bradford Street, former Mary’s Snack Bar, now demolished, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

From the 1940s through the 1960s, this shack was Mary’s Snack Bar — better known as Mary Spaghetti’s — run by Mary Souza. Open until 3 a.m., it was a popular rendezvous with “night prowlers,” as The Advocate put it, and anathema to the neighbors. Among the night prowlers once — it is said — were Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton. Mary’s claims to fame were clamburgers and pepper steak, but the name of the joint suggested another specialty of the house — besides general uproar. Kim Oliver of Provincetown Florist, who owns the property, replaced the tumbledown shack with a Cape-style cottage in 2011.

3 Bradford Street

3 Bradford Street, Provincetown Welding Works, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

3 Bradford Street, Provincetown Welding Works, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

3 Bradford Street, Provincetown Welding Works, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

3 Bradford Street, Provincetown Welding Works, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

3 Bradford Street, Provincetown Welding Works, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

3 Bradford Street, Provincetown Welding Works, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

Michael Kacergis, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

Michael Kacergis, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

The amazingly animate yard of the Provincetown Welding Works looks like a Tim Burton movie come to three-dimensional life. It was founded in 1946 by Clarence Kacergis. “At first, he imagined a simple welding shop until several Provincetown artists and sculptors looked to stretch themselves and embrace metal as a heightened form of expression,” Gerry Desautels wrote in The Banner. Among them was Chaim Gross. In the present day, Desautels continued: “Maritime objects, fauna, flora and Cape characters — strumming musicians, rowing sailors and sawing woodsmen — are depicted in quirky Kacergis style throughout the chock-a-block shop. … The works are wonders of modern recycling and years of collecting parts and pieces.” Clarence’s son, Michael, succeeded to the business.

27A Bradford Street

27A Bradford Street, fly loft of the Barnstormers' Theater, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

27A Bradford Street, fly loft of the Barnstormers’ Theater, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

In a town of wild structures, this amazing relic is one of the wildest: a fly loft for a theater that was integral to the Provincetown renaissance. Frank Shay, an editor and bookseller, belonged to the Provincetown Players. In 1924, to keep the spirit alive after the troupe moved to New York, he converted his barn into the Barnstormers’ Theater, Leona Rust Egan wrote in Provincetown as a Stage. After Paul Robeson’s successful portrayal of The Emperor Jones, Shay campaigned to bring that production to town. Instead, Egan said, Robeson appeared here in 1925 in a program of spirituals and folk songs. Local lore has it that Bette Davis also trod these boards. The cottage colony around the theater was known in the 1940s and ’50s as Skipper Raymond’s Cottages, run by Frank and Frances (Perry) Raymond, who’s on the mural at Fishermen’s Wharf. Napi Van Dereck now owns the property.

31 Bradford Street

31 Bradford Street, Carreiro's Tip for Tops'n, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

31 Bradford Street, Carreiro’s Tip for Tops’n, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

31 Bradford Street, Carreiro's Tip for Tops'n, by David W. Dunlap (2012).

31 Bradford Street, Carreiro’s Tip for Tops’n, by David W. Dunlap (2012).

From the name (“Tip of the Cape for Tops in Service”) to the nautical décor to the satisfyingly good Portuguese food, Carreiro’s Tip for Tops’n was a throwback in every sense except its popularity. Ernest Carreiro, a native of São Miguel in the Azores, ran Anybody’s Market in this building until the early 1950s, when he opened Tip. The business was acquired in 1966 by Edward “Babe” Carreiro of New Bedford, who had skippered Jenny B, and his wife, Eva (Cook) Carreiro. It passed to their sons Joseph Carreiro and Gerald Carreiro, whose widow, Joyce, ran the business until the end, in 2012. Devon Ruesch renovated the property, keeping much of the décor, and reopened it as Devon’s Deep Sea Dive.

35 Bradford Street

35 Bradford Street, Bonnie Doone Restaurant, courtesy of Joseph Andrews.

35 Bradford Street, Bonnie Doone Restaurant, courtesy of Joseph Andrews.

This site has been hopping since 1937, when the Bonnie Doone Grille (later the Bonnie Doone Restaurant) was opened by Mary (Prada) Cabral, who ran it with her husband, Manuel. Their daughter, Barbara, married Richard Oppen in 1948, after which the two couples ran the place, helped in turn by the third generation, Bonnie (Oppen) Jordan and her husband Joel Vizard. Its Thistle Cocktail Lounge was a popular gay rendezvous in the 1950s. The restaurant gained parking space in 1958 by tearing down the abutting former Conant Street School. In recent years, the building was remodeled by William Dougal and Rick Murray as the Mussel Beach Health Club, which they had opened on Shank Painter Road in 1993. They also own the Crown & Anchor.

35 Bradford Street, Bonnie Doone Restaurant, courtesy of Joseph Andrews.

35 Bradford Street, Bonnie Doone Restaurant, courtesy of Joseph Andrews.

41 Bradford Street

41 Bradford Street, Bradford House & Motel, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

41 Bradford Street, Bradford House & Motel, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

41 Bradford Street, Bradford House & Motel, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

41 Bradford Street, Bradford House & Motel, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

Two distinct forms of hospitality — the guest house and the motel — are combined in one operation at the Bradford House & Motel. Hotel lore says the main house was built in 1888 by Reuben Brown, a coal and lumber merchant, for his intended wife. Its flying staircase was photographed by Joel Meyerowitz for Cape Light. The Browns’ son, Dr. Roy Brown, sold the house in the 1940s to Thomas and Anna (Crawley) Cote, whose father was Frank “Scarry Jack” Crawley. They added the one-story motel wing in 1950.

44 Bradford Street

44 Bradford Street, Provincetown Community Center, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

44 Bradford Street, Provincetown Community Center, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

44 Bradford Street, Governor Bradford School of 1892.

44 Bradford Street, Governor Bradford School of 1892.

The Colonial Revival-style New Governor Bradford School was built to replace the first Governor Bradford School, which was built in 1892 and burned down in 1935. The school became the Provincetown Community Center in 1956. Susan Leonard, a town native and historian, said the center’s focus was on after-school arts-and-crafts classes, Ping Pong, Camp Fire Girls and Boy Scouts; the halls echoing with the voices of easily a hundred kids. Friday night dances were the place to be for P.H.S. students, she said, and almost everyone’s first real date was here. The center moved in 2013 to the Veterans Memorial Elementary School. The fate of the building was unsettled at press time.

67 Bradford Street

9 Court Street, the Captain's House of the Brass Key Guesthouse, 67 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

9 Court Street, the Captain’s House of the Brass Key Guesthouse, 67 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

The deluxe Brass Key Guesthouse has grown by accretion into a large compound. The expansion was the work of Michael MacIntyre and his husband, Bob Anderson, who died in 2004. They also refurbished Land’s End Inn. Thomas Walter, Kenneth Masi, and David Sanford, the owners of Crowne Pointe, acquired the property in 2007. It includes:

8 Carver Street, the Queen Anne House of the Brass Key Guesthouse, 67 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

8 Carver Street, the Queen Anne House of the Brass Key Guesthouse, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

¶ The Queen Anne House, 8 Carver Street. This eclectic confection was the Cottage Inn in the 19th century. It was later home to Moses Nickerson Gifford, president of the First National Bank and son of James Gifford, namesake of the hotel up the street. Andrew Turocy III bought the house in 1981 and operated it as Roomers.

10 Carver Street, the Victorian House of the Brass Key Guesthouse, 67 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

10 Carver Street, the Victorian House of the Brass Key Guesthouse, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

¶ The Victorian House, 10 Carver Street, was built around 1865 in Second Empire style. It belonged to William Henry Young, the first president of the Provincetown Art Association and founder of what is now the Benson Young & Downs Insurance Agency. His wife, Anna (Hughes) Young, was a founder of the Research Club. It is for their son, Lewis A. Young, who died in World War I, that the Veterans of Foreign Wars post was named. Subsequent owners included Arthur and Martha (Alves) Roderick, who raised four children here before selling it in 1978.

¶ The Gatehouse and Shipwreck Lounge, 12 Carver Street, was home in the 1960s to Joseph and Virginia (Souza) Lewis, proprietors of the Pilgrim House. Lewis was a founder of the Portuguese-American Civic League. This building and 10 Carver were known together in the 1970s and ’80s as Haven House, run by Don Robertson.

Gus McCleod at George's Inn, by David Jarrett (1971).

Gus McCleod at George’s Inn, by David Jarrett (1971).

¶ The Captain’s House, 9 Court Street, was built in 1830 in the Federal style and is the most imposing building in the complex. It played an important role in the development of the gay and lesbian business community as George’s Inn, opened in 1964 by George Littrell. In the late ‘70s, it explicitly sought gay patrons only. Littrell was an early leader in the Provincetown Business Guild; in effect, the gay Chamber of Commerce. The inn closed in 1982. Littrell died in 2000.

70 Bradford Street

70 Bradford Street, the Bradford-Carver House, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

70 Bradford Street, the Bradford-Carver House, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

Capt. Joseph Enos ran the Bradford Market in this mid-19th-century house in the 1940s. Twenty years later, it was the home of Irving McDonald, who wrote three novels, intended for Catholic boys, that charted the adventures of Andy Carroll at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester. He taught a “Communist Conspiracy” course at P.H.S. The property was later Steele’s Guest House and is now the Bradford-Carver House, operated by Kenneth Nelson.

72-82 Bradford Street

70-82 Bradford Street, Crowne Pointe Historic Inn and Spa, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

70-82 Bradford Street, Crowne Pointe Historic Inn and Spa, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

The Crowne Pointe Historic Inn and Spa occupies a commanding spot in what appears to be giddy Queen Anne style, though the turret is actually a much later addition. Known in the 1950s as Lynn House and in the ’80s as the Dusty Miller Inn, it was reopened in 1999 and is owned by the proprietors of the Brass Key: Thomas Walter, Kenneth Masi, and David Sanford. The Crowne Pointe, too, is a compound: the Mansion, 82 Bradford; the Abbey and Garden Residence, 80 Bradford (formerly the Sea Drift Inn); the Wellness Spa, 78 Bradford; and the Captain’s House, 4 Prince Street.

89 Bradford Street

Grace Gouveia and Mary Goveia, 89 Bradford Street, courtesy of Susan Leonard.

Grace Gouveia and Mary Goveia, 89 Bradford Street, courtesy of Susan Leonard.

Grace Gouveia, pictured at No. 89 with her mother, Mary Goveia, was born in Olhao, Portugal. Her father, Charles, was a Grand Banks fisherman. She recalled: “My mother would get word that the vessel was sighted off the back side, and without stopping for anything, she’d grab me by the hand, and take me down to the beach, where other women were gathered. They waited in silence … to see if the boat was coming in at half-mast. Once they saw it was not half-masted they knelt and blessed themselves, and went home to prepare for their men. If the ship came in at half-mast, as it often did, there was weeping and wringing of hands, and prayers were offered.” Gouveia taught for 27 years, joined the Peace Corps, and helped establish the Council on Aging, which was housed until recently in the Grace Gouveia Building. The house was built in 1847.

90 Bradford Street

90 Bradford Street, the Fairbanks Inn, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

90 Bradford Street, the Fairbanks Inn, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

Other inns may come across like museums, but Eben House actually was one. The Federal-style, brick-sided home was built in 1776 by Capt. Eben Snow. It was purchased in 1826 by David Fairbanks, a founder of the Seamen’s Bank, and in 1865 by a tin merchant, Charles Baxter Snow Sr., and his wife, Anna (Lancy) Snow. It passed to their daughter, Gertrude (Snow) DeWager, and her husband, Dr. E. A. DeWager, staying in the family until 1953. Stan Sorrentino, the owner of the Crown & Anchor and a collector of American folk art, reopened it in 1975 as the David Fairbanks House, filled with more than 1,000 examples of antique folk art. From 1985 to 2014, it was the Fairbanks Inn, run by Alicia Mickenberg and Kathleen Fitzgerald. At press time, it is being transformed into a luxury property by Kevin O’Shea and David Bowd of the Salt House Inn, renamed in its builder’s honor.

94 Bradford Street

94 Bradford Street, Marine Hall, courtesy of Salvador R. Vasques III (ca 1929).

94 Bradford Street, Marine Hall, courtesy of Salvador R. Vasques III (ca 1929).

Village Hall was built in 1832 as a secular meeting place. It was renamed Marine Hall after Marine Lodge No. 96 of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows was chartered here in 1845. They bought the building the next year. The Masons also gathered here. The first meeting of the Board of Trade (now the Chamber of Commerce) was convened here in 1870 by John Atwood Jr. In 1886, The Advocate began printing here on steam-driven presses. The Odd Fellows built a new headquarters next door in 1895, after which this served as a Christian Science Church. It was demolished decades ago. The graves of Odd Fellows are often carved with three links, for friendship, love, and truth.

96-98 Bradford Street

96-98 Bradford Street, AIDS Support Group of Cape Cod, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

96-98 Bradford Street, AIDS Support Group of Cape Cod, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

Detail of Provincetown AIDS Support Group sign, 96-98 Bradford Street, courtesy of Bill Furdon.

Detail of Provincetown AIDS Support Group sign, 96-98 Bradford Street, courtesy of Bill Furdon.

Less than a decade and a half after its first appearance in town in 1982, AIDS had claimed more than 385 lives, one-tenth of the permanent population, Jeanne Braham and Pamela Peterson wrote in Starry, Starry Night. By then, the Provincetown AIDS Support Group had established its front-line quarters in the Queen Anne-style Odd Fellows Hall, used from 1895 to 1955 by the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, one of whose missions was visiting and caring for the sick. PASG was founded in 1983 by Alice Foley, the town nurse; Preston Babbitt, proprietor of the Rose & Crown; and others. Its services include case management, transportation assistance, food and nutrition programs, H.I.V. prevention and screening, and housing. By merger in 2001, it became the AIDS Support Group of Cape Cod. Foley died in 2009; Babbitt in 1990, of AIDS.

97 Bradford Street

97 Bradford Street, Romeo's Holiday, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

97 Bradford Street, Romeo’s Holiday, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

97 Bradford Street, Romeo's Holiday, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

97 Bradford Street, Romeo’s Holiday, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

With its pink facade, the eight-room Romeo’s Holiday guest house is easy enough to see from across the street. But it’s worth getting closer to inspect the Ken and Barbie poolside tableaux, staged with dolls around a goldfish pond in the sliver of a front yard. The house was built in the mid-19th century. Stan Klein, the proprietor, said there was once an after-hours club on the property in which Judy Garland “delighted her followers” and that the building had been a guest house at least since the mid-1970s, known for a time as Pete’s Buoy.

100 Bradford Street

100 Bradford Street, New England Telephone and Telegraph Company central switchboard, courtesy of Duane Steele and Mary-Jo Avellar.

100 Bradford Street, New England Telephone and Telegraph Company central switchboard, courtesy of Duane Steele and Mary-Jo Avellar.

Mary-Jo Avellar and Duane Steele, 100 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2012).

Mary-Jo Avellar and Duane Steele, 100 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2012).

Provincetown had hand-cranked telephones until 1938, when 100 Bradford was built as the switching center for the New England Telephone and Telegraph Company, allowing customers to lift their receivers to summon an operator. Until 1966, 16 telephone operators stood by, greeting callers: “Number please.” After the town converted to direct dialing, this was briefly the Chrysler Glass Museum, home of Walter Chrysler Jr.’s collection of Sandwich glass. The Advocate moved here in 1975. It undertook an expansion and modernization in 1977, designed by John Moberg of Mobic Design-Build, with a newsroom, composing room, and two darkrooms. The newspaper was acquired by Duane Steele and Mary-Jo Avellar, who still live here.

102-104A Bradford Street

Elizabeth Gabriel Brooke, 104 Bradford Street, courtesy of Elizabeth Gabriel Brooke (ca 1979).

Elizabeth Gabriel Brooke, 104 Bradford Street, courtesy of Elizabeth Gabriel Brooke (ca 1979).

Elizabeth Gabriel Brooke, proprietor of the Provincetown Hotel at Gabriel’s and founder of the Women Innkeepers of Provincetown, says hers is the oldest continuously-run woman-owned inn in the country, having opened in 1979 as the Gabriel Apartments & Guest Rooms. It has “welcomed everyone for many years,” she adds. First, Brooke, Laurel Daigle Wise, and Christina and William Davidson acquired Nos. 104 and 104A, the abandoned Lighthouse Apartments for fishermen and transients. (No. 104 once housed the Cape & Vineyard Electric Company and, before that, Provincetown Light and Power.) Brooke acquired No. 102A in 1995 and the handsome, Federal-style No. 102 in 2000, and rebuilt both from basement to attic. Through 2013, this was known as the Ashbrooke Inn at Gabriel’s.

Town Green (Bas Relief Park)

Town Green, Bas Relief, by Det. Rich Alves, Provincetown Police Department (2015).

Town Green, Bas Relief, by Det. Rich Alves (2015).

Town Green, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

Town Green, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

The centerpiece of Town Green is Signing the Compact, better known as the Bas Relief. The park and monument date from 1920, the 300th anniversary of the Pilgrims’ landfall. The 170-foot-wide park property, once occupied by houses, was taken by the state to create a vista of the Pilgrim Monument. The bronze relief, 16 by 9 feet, was designed by Cyrus Dallin and cast by the Gorham Manufacturing Company. It had a haunting quality in the winter of 2015. Nearby are a memorial to five Mayflower passengers who died while the ship lay in the harbor, and a tablet with the compact’s text, in which some see early stirrings of American democracy. Years ago, other stirrings in the densely wooded park involved sexual escapades, some of whose participants ended up in jail — just across Bradford Street in Town Hall.

109 Bradford Street

109 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

109 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

109 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

109 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

Napoleon “Gene” Poyant didn’t have much of a commute from this 1840s home, tucked behind the former Congregational Church of the Pilgrims. Poyant served in the Coast Guard during World War II, stationed at Race Point, falling in love with Provincetown in the process. In the 1950s, he ran Gene’s Pastry Shoppe, on what had been the church’s front yard on Commercial Street. It became one of the liveliest spots in town after 1960, when he opened Café Poyant, one of the first sidewalk cafés in town. The portrait artist Harvey Dodd completed the tableau. In the mid-’60s, Poyant sought to rid the town of beatniks. “Mark my words,” he warned, “we won’t have a decent town for long.”

115 Bradford Street

115 Bradford Street, Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

115 Bradford Street, Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

115 Bradford Street, Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

115 Bradford Street, Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

This lovely and consequential house from around 1875-1885 has been in the foreground of thousands of pictures taken from the Pilgrim Monument. The decorative truss and vergeboard (pictured) are unmistakable. Walter Chrysler Jr. made his home here while running the Chrysler Art Museum. Roslyn Garfield, lawyer, real estate broker, and civic leader, had her office here. Staying here as a renter, Urvashi Vaid wrote Virtual Equality. This was once the office of the Provincetown Business Guild, founded in 1978 as a group of gay-run and gay-friendly establishments. Since 2001, it has been the headquarters of the Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies, an organization devoted to research, public education, and conservation — best known for its work with marine mammals. It was founded in 1975 by Charles “Stormy” Mayo, Barbara Mayo, and Graham Giese.

116 Bradford Street

116 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

116 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

As its name suggests, the Burch House, circa 1840-1850, was home to the Burch family for many years. It was owned by J. M. Burch in the early 20th century and occupied by Huldah Theodora (Anderson) Burch until her death in 1959. Her only child, Jean Nichols, conveyed the property in 1962 to Herbert Cronin. As the purposefully modest 17-room Burch House, it stressed its inexpensive, informal nature, and was a popular guest house among gay visitors. It is also an especially fine example of the Greek Revival style, with a front facade of flushboard siding intended to evoke the smooth surface of a temple front.

118 Bradford Street

118 Bradford Street, Clarendon House, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

118 Bradford Street, Clarendon House, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

Local tradition typically grants to 119 Bradford the distinction of having served as the original King Hiram’s Lodge. But this nobly proportioned, Federal-style house may also be a candidate. An 1836 map shows a Methodist church — not a Masonic lodge — where No. 119 stands now. And an 1890 guide book states that the old lodge passed to the heirs of Thomas Atkins, as this building had. In 1939, Eloise Browne bought the property and opened the Eloise Browne House. John Kelly gave it the name Clarendon House in the 1980s, after a street in Boston. Sidney Royal III succeeded him. Dale Chin and James Furlong bought the place in 2002, spruced it up considerably, and maintained it as a seven-room guest house until 2013.

129 Bradford Street

129 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

129 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

Bryant House, as this property was known for many years, was opened by Mary Ann (MacKenzie) Bryant of Nova Scotia in 1914. At first it was a restaurant specializing in seafood, roasts, chops, and steaks. Her daughter-in-law, Marie-Louise (Kopp) Bryant, expanded it into a guest house, which she ran until 1949. Marie-Louise’s son, George Bryant, is an architectural historian and legendary local iconoclast. This was l’Hotel Hibou in the 1970s; Eddie’s Pastry Shop, run by Eddie Moran, in the ’90s; and, more recently, the Monument Barber Shop. It’s now the summer home of Alan Cancelino and Scott Perry of New York.

130 Bradford Street

130 Bradford Street, Sajivan Gulf Oil, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

130 Bradford Street, Sajivan Gulf Oil, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

130 Bradford Street, Gulf Oil station, courtesy of the Provincetown History Preservation Project (1977).

130 Bradford Street, Gulf Oil station, courtesy of the Provincetown History Preservation Project (1977).

At downtown’s heart are two service stations. Like many older Gulf Oil buildings, the Sajivan Inc. dealership at No. 130 has a Colonial Revival motif. Hubert and Laura Summers owned it until 1958 and ran a popular restaurant, It’s Hubert’s, which doubled as the bus terminal. Marcey’s Service Station followed, under Edward “Marcey” Salvador, who gave his nickname to the Marcey Oil Company. He sold the station to James Cordeiro, who turned it over to his son Neil. Cumberland Farms used to run the convenience store. The parking lot next door, once site of the Central School House, is where Linda Silva, a state social-services investigator, was killed in 1996 by Paul DuBois, who blamed her for losing custody of his children.

132 Bradford Street

132 Bradford Street, Old Colony Railroad passenger depot, courtesy of the Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum.

132 Bradford Street, Old Colony Railroad passenger depot, courtesy of the Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum.

365 Old King's Highway, North Truro, Old Colony Railroad freight depot from 132 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

365 Old King’s Highway, North Truro, Old Colony Railroad freight depot from 132 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

Provincetown was firmly joined to the mainland in 1873, when the Old Colony Railroad inaugurated service from Boston. The depots stood here but the tracks continued to Railroad Wharf, to serve the fishing fleet. Four trains crawled daily up and down the Cape. They brought thousands of visitors, including New Yorkers who’d taken overnight boats to Fall River before switching to the train. Old Colony was subsumed into the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad in 1893. The last regularly scheduled passenger train ran in 1938. The passenger depot was replaced in 1950 by Duarte Motors, now the Duarte Mall. The freight depot was moved to 365 Old King’s Highway in North Truro, where it stands.

133 Bradford Street

Gene Greene, standing, Terrace Restaurant, 133 Bradford Street, by David Jarrett (1981).

Gene Greene, standing, Terrace Restaurant, 133 Bradford Street, by David Jarrett (1981).

A set of cascading brick terraces runs alongside this house, built in the mid-19th century, creating what would seem to be an ideal setting for romantic summer dining. The property was purchased in 1976 by Gene Greene and Alton “Al” Stilson, proprietors of the Ranch guest house at 198 Commercial. Greene ran this property as the well-regarded Terrace Restaurant. It was more recently l’Uva Restaurant. The chef, Christopher Covelli, was also the proprietor of Christopher’s by the Bay. L’Uva closed after the 2007 season. In 2011, Krista Kranyak reopened the space as Ten Tables, which only lasted three seasons. It is now Backstreet, under chef Raul Garcia, formerly of Edwige.