21 Atkins-Mayo Road

21 Atkins-Mayor Road, by David W. Dunlap (2013).

21 Atkins-Mayor Road, by David W. Dunlap (2013).

Romolo Del Deo, by David W. Dunlap (2013).

Romolo Del Deo, by David W. Dunlap (2013).

This is the home and studio of the sculptor and graphic artist Romolo Del Deo, whose Fishermen’s Memorial is intended for MacMillan Wharf, once the needed money is raised. His mother, Josephine (Couch) Del Deo, told me this house was probably built soon after the parcel was acquired in 1915 by Col. Francis Bacon Jones, who fought in the Civil War. His children were the artist Mary Bacon Jones, an important member of the Provincetown color woodblock group, and Russell Jones, who sold the property in 1928 to his brother-in-law, Shorb Floyd Jones. Josephine and Sal Del Deo, and Josephine’s mother, Osma Gallinger Tod, bought it in 1971. Romolo studied in Florence, Carrara, and Pietrasanta, and counts Dimitri Hadzi among his teachers. He’s owned this property since 1992.

31 Atkins-Mayo Road

Sal Del Deo in his studio, an out building at 31 Atkins-Mayo Road, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

Sal Del Deo in his studio, an out building at 31 Atkins-Mayo Road, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

The artist and restaurateur Salvatore Del Deo — namesake of both Ciro & Sal’s and Sal’s Place — has owned this property since 1955 with his wife, Josephine (Couch) Del Deo. She is the town historian emerita; a moving force behind the Cape Cod National Seashore, the Historic District, and the former Heritage Museum, and the author of Figures in a Landscape, a biography of Ross Moffett; and Compass Grass Anthology. In 1953, she married Sal, who had attended the Art Students League and the Vesper George School of Art in Boston before coming to town to study with Henry Hensche. His studio is a freestanding building out back. To design it, Del Deo told me, he measured the dimensions of studios used by Moffett, Philip Malicoat, Pauline Palmer, Max Bohm, Frederick Waugh, and Charles Hawthorne. The main house was originally the studio of Mary Bacon Jones.

Sal and Josephine Del Deo at home, 31 Atkins-Mayo Road, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

Sal and Josephine Del Deo at home, 31 Atkins-Mayo Road, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

56 Atkins-Mayo Road

56 Atkins-Mayo Road, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

56 Atkins-Mayo Road, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

This stout, angular box of a studio was built in the 1950s for Boris Margo, a Ukrainian native who emigrated to the United States in 1930 and married the artist Jan Gelb. They spent summers in a dune shack that still bears their names. “Margo pioneered new materials and techniques to create his biomorphic and lyrically abstract work,” Pamela Mandell wrote in On Equal Ground. In 1971, squatters started a fire that burned the studio down, though firemen did all they could to save the artwork. Margo and his nephew Murray Zimiles rebuilt in 1973. Since Margo’s death in 1995, the studio has been used by Zimiles and his niece, Dawn Zimiles, a painter and mixed-media artist.

8 Atwood Avenue

8 Atwood Avenue, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

8 Atwood Avenue, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

When you spot a white-on-blue plaque of a house aboard a scow — as there is on this lovely three-quarter Cape — you’re in the presence of a building that was floated over from Long Point, an early 19th-century settlement on the thin finger of land separating Cape Cod Bay from Provincetown Harbor. By the late 1860s, as the near-shore fishery grew depleted, the settlement had to be abandoned. Almost 40 structures were salvaged, however, and floated over to town as the plaque suggests, including this one and two nearby, at 10 and 12 Atwood.

10 Atwood Avenue

10 Atwood Avenue, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

10 Atwood Avenue, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

Clustered around Atwood Avenue and Point Street are many of the Long Point floaters whose historical provenance seems most solid. At the heart of the property at No. 10 is a house that was believed to have belonged to Joseph Butler when it stood out at the point, somewhat in the center of the settlement. By the 1860s, it had been moved across the harbor. In 1862, it became the home of the newly wedded Adelia (Morgan) Atwood and Stephen Atwood. Her great love was the Centenary Methodist Church, where she sang in the choir. Joseph Collins and Harry Clark of San Francisco bought the house in 1999 and undertook a renovation that preserved a lot of the distinctive architectural features that had grown by accretion over the decades.

3 Aunt Sukey’s Way

3 Aunt Sukey's Way, Jack Kearney's studio and workshop, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

3 Aunt Sukey’s Way, Jack Kearney’s studio and workshop, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

Jack Kearney of Chicago, who trained at the Cranbrook Academy of Art and in Italy, was a sculptor in the classical medium of bronze and the less classical medium of automobile parts. This was his studio and fabrication plant, on property he purchased in 1984. “Kearney has welded the curved ends of chrome car bumpers into the organic shapes of such beasts as the bison, Siberian tiger, snowy egret and white rhinoceros,” Christopher Busa wrote in Provincetown Arts. Among the works cast here were characters from The Wizard of Oz, for Oz Park in Chicago. When a girl spotted the newly finished Tin Man, she admonished the sculptor that he’d forgotten the heart. Kearney told her father to bring her back the next day, by which time he’d given Tin Man a heart of stainless steel. A man of great heart himself, Kearney died in 2014.

1 Baker Avenue

1 Baker Avenue, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

1 Baker Avenue, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

Ryan Landry, by Sue Harrison (2014).

Ryan Landry, by Sue Harrison (2014).

A picturesque exemplar of the Cape Cod house (in this case a three-quarter Cape with Greek Revival flourishes, built around 1830), 1 Baker further profits from its situation, roughly perpendicular to Pearl Street, which sets it off charmingly. A century and more ago, this was home to the Baker family. Since 2010, it has been owned by Ryan Landry, the indefatigable impresario behind the popular Showgirls revue and shepherd of the Gold Dust Orphans troupe, whose productions have included Mildred Fierce, Pornocchio, Mary Poppers, Valet of the Dolls, and Silent Night of the Lambs.