Annie C. Perry

Hard to believe from our generally insular ignorance of history, but this schooner was a casualty of a German submarine attack during the closing months of World War I, 3 August 1918, as noted by Josef Berger — writing pseudonymously as Jeremiah Digges — in his 1941 book, In Great Waters: The Story of the Portuguese Fishermen, page 244-245. She was built in 1903. Noted in 1906 Schooner Records, available as a PDF file from the Provincetown History Preservation Project. Built especially for Capt. Marion A. Perry and named after his infant daughter. With this vessel, Perry “took his place among the big ‘killers’ of the banks fishery,” said Berger at page 202. Perry’s next command would be named for his wife: the Rose Dorothea. Capt. Manuel (Inacio) Enos, of 36 Pleasant Street, also commanded her.

Antonio Jorge


Formerly the Divino Criador. A 60-foot, 66-ton commercial fishing vessel built in 1971 by Daly’s Boat Yard; registered to Antonio Jorge Inc., according to BoatInfoWorld.com. Blessed by Bishop O’Malley in 1997. Participant in a 2002 test of a sweepless raised footrope trawl by the NOAA Fisheries Service. Shown as a “resident fishing fleet” lessee through 2005 at MacMillan Pier in the Provincetown Public Pier Corporation master lease. Profiled on I Am Provincetown. Manny Diaz [?]. Jorge Dias [?]. One of five [?] boats in the fleet with federal ground fishing permits. “Provincetown celebrates 63rd annual blessing of the fleet, Portuguese Festival” mentions and quotes Dias. As the Divino Criador: Blessed by Bishop Cronin in 1977, 1978, 1980. Blessed by Bishop Cronin in 1981. Blessed by Bishop Cronin in 1983.

Atlanta


In 1932, she was owned by Captain Louis Santos of 366 Commercial Street. In 1942, the owner and captain was Louis Santos. Blessed by Bishop Cassidy in 1948. In 1949, under Captain Joseph Silva, the Atlanta had the sad task of recovering the airplane that had crashed off Race Point, killing five persons. Under the ownership of Captain Joseph B. Silva of 24 Standish Street in 1951, she was to be replaced by the Linda & Warren. The captain in 1952 was Walter Harding.

Beatrice S.

A beam trawler. The Beatrice S. was named Best All-Around Boat at the Second Anniversary Ball of the Provincetown Fishermen’s Association in January 1939. The caption accompanying this 1937 picture by Edwin Rosskam says: “In the cabin of the Beatrice S., a beam-trawler which was one of a considerable fleet that fished out of Provincetown as late as ’37. Today there is a mere handful of these boats left. Their practice is at sea, wherever the water is shallow enough to allow the nets to drag until a catch is made, sometimes several days. This cabin is the living, dining, bedroom and kitchen.”

Blue Ocean


A 54-foot, 41-ton commercial fishing vessel built in 1952 at Webber’s Cove Boat Yard; registered to AJ Inc., according to BoatInfoWorld.com. Participant in a 2002 test of a sweepless raised footrope trawl by the NOAA Fisheries Service. Shown as a “resident fishing fleet” lessee through 2005 at MacMillan Pier in the Provincetown Public Pier Corporation master lease. Profiled on I Am Provincetown. Captain and owner is Luis Ribas.

Blue Skies


A 56-foot, 51-ton commercial fishing vessel built in 1957 by Morehead City Shipbuilding; registered to Barrosa Fishing Corporation, according to BoatInfoWorld.com. Blessed by Bishop O’Malley in 1997. Participant in a 2002 test of a sweepless raised footrope trawl by the NOAA Fisheries Service. Shown as a “resident fishing fleet” lessee through 2005 at MacMillan Pier in the Provincetown Public Pier Corporation master lease. Profiled on I Am Provincetown. Captain and owner is Luis Ribas.

Bob-Bee

Trapboat. Named after Judge Robert Welch and his sister Beatrice. Found the dead body of James F. Morris, whose dory had capsized, in 1951. Caught a 960-pound tuna in 1954. The crew in 1955 was headed by Captain Manuel “Muggsy” Souza and included Joe “Tarts” Bent, engineer; Manuel “Burr” Ferreira, bow man; Phillip “Amos” Cook, dory man; and Francis Packet, all-around man.