Bowhead

1899. The Bowhead was not a lucky boat for Captain John A. Cook, as noted in James Theriault’s “A Seafaring Heritage.” Cook returned to Provincetown in 1908 “after concluding a disastrous 44-month whaling voyage in the Arctic Ocean” that “included the mutiny of his crew, the mental collapse of his wife Viola and his being unofficially removed from command.” Viola Cook’s descent into madness — an understandable response to her husband’s refusal to give up his trip empty-handed — was dramatized by Eugene O’Neill in Ile (the captain’s pronunciation of “oil”). Noted in Wooden Ships and Iron Men (Heritage Museum, 1994), by Reginald W. Cabral and James Theriault, available as a PDF file from the Provincetown History Preservation Project.

Cap’n Bill

 
In one of the three worst accidents to befall the Provincetown fleet during the modern era, the Cap’n Bill went down on 9 February 1978. Captain Ralph E. Andrews, 57, perished, as did Robert Sullivan, 32; Edward Hoenig, 21; and 19-year-old Ernest Tasha. (The two other disastrous wrecks in living memory were the Patricia Marie and the Victory II.) Paintings of all three boats can be seen at the Seamen’s Bank. But there is an even more tangible and prominent memorial to the Cap’n Bill: the 10½-foot anchor from the early 19th century that sits in the center of Lopes Square. This was brought ashore by Capt. George Adams and his crew after the anchor was caught in the Cap’n Bill‘s netting at the Pollock Rip off Chatham in 1959. Rather than claim whatever their shares might have been in the sale of such a noble and handsome piece of marine salvage, the crew decided to donate the anchor to the town, for the express purpose of public display in Lopes Square. Adams was preceded as skipper by Capt. Joseph E. Macara, who was also an/the [?] owner of the boat. In the Vessel/Owners Log, the owner was shown as Ralph E. Andrews of 208 Bradford Street and the boat was valued at $12,900. Alfred Joseph Jr. was also a co-owner. (“Alfred Joseph Jr., 84,” The Banner, June 3, 2004.)

Cape Cod Princess


The 94-foot passenger ship Cape Cod Princess, not new but refurbished, entered service from Provincetown in 1980. She did not run to Boston, but to Plymouth. And when her excursion and ferry duties were done for the day, she would go out whale watching. The vessel could carry up to 379 passengers. It was owned by the Plymouth & Provincetown Steamship Company and moored at Fisherman’s Wharf.

Carrie D. Knowles

Provincetown has been waiting 107 years for news from the Carrie D. Knowles. There has been none yet, though a cruel hoax in 1909 half-convinced the town that there was some hope that crew members survived. The story is told by Josef Berger — writing pseudonymously as Jeremiah Digges — in his 1941 book, In Great Waters: The Story of the Portuguese Fishermen, pages 271-273. Noted in “List of Provincetown Whalers,” an appendix to The Provincetown Book (Tolman Print, 1922), by Nancy W. Paine Smith, available on Google Books. Noted in Wooden Ships and Iron Men (Heritage Museum, 1994), by Reginald W. Cabral and James Theriault, available as a PDF file from the Provincetown History Preservation Project.

Carrie E. Phillips

The Carrie E. Phillips was said to be the only fishing schooner designed by Edward Burgess, two of whose yachts won the America’s Cup. “During the years 1877 until she ran on the rocks at White Head, Me., and pounded herself to pieces in 1899, [the Phillips] had outsailed everything that was made to earn its living on the Banks,” said Josef Berger — writing pseudonymously as Jeremiah Digges — in his 1941 book, In Great Waters: The Story of the Portuguese Fishermen, page 199. Manuel “Captain Roll-Down” Caton skippered this schooner in the early 1890s, making news when he arrived in Boston with 24,000 pounds of halibut to find a 13-cent-a-pound market, resulting in a crew share of $75.68 a man, Berger said, at page 124. Caton also commanded the Sea Fox, the Addison Center and the Philomena Manta, when she was lost in February 1905. (He and the crew were rescued by a Gloucester schooner). Caton perished in 1918 while fishing for snapper off Florida.

Carter Braxton

The Carter Braxton was a ship — technically, not generically — that first set sail for the Atlantic whaling grounds in 1842. She was owned by Joseph Atkins, builder of the Central Wharf in 1839. Noted in “List of Provincetown Whalers,” an appendix to The Provincetown Book (Tolman Print, 1922), by Nancy W. Paine Smith, available on Google Books. Noted in Wooden Ships and Iron Men (Heritage Museum, 1994), by Reginald W. Cabral and James Theriault, available as a PDF file from the Provincetown History Preservation Project.

Charlotte G.

In October 1953, Capt. Henrique Duarte and his crew — Paulino Urtiago, Frederick Roche, Anthony Jackett and Manuel Henrique — brought to shore the body of Capt. Arild Hansen of Dennisport, skipper of the Pat-er-glo, which had foundered in the bay six months earlier. Henry Duarte was the captain in 1955. Arnold Goldberg owned it in 1962 and Henry Duarte was the captain. At the time of the Vessels/Owners Log, it was owned by Arnold Goldberg of Brookline, Mass., and was valued at $12,900. Blessed by Bishop Cronin in 1977, 1978, 1980. Blessed by Bishop Cronin in 1981. Blessed by Bishop Cronin in 1983. Blessed by Bishop O’Malley in 1997.

Chico-Jess

Formerly the Michael Ann
Ferdinand R. “Fred” Salvador, a native of Olhao, Portugal, was a leading fisherman from the 1920s through the 70s. He skippered the Michael Ann. Blessed by Bishop Cronin in 1977, 1978, 1980. Blessed by Bishop Cronin in 1981. Blessed by Bishop Cronin in 1983, still as the Michael Ann. Blessed by Bishop O’Malley in 1997, now as the Chico-Jess. Shown as a “resident fishing fleet” lessee through 2005 at MacMillan Pier in the Provincetown Public Pier Corporation master lease. Still working in 2007 — the oldest wood-hulled boat in the town fleet — as the Chico-Jess. Profiled on I Am Provincetown. Sank. Captain and owner was Francisco Vicente. “Provincetown’s fishing fleet is sinking fast.”