250 Bradford Street

The name of Mark Rothko (1903-1970) is not commonly associated with Provincetown, but he was indeed here for a few years, beginning in 1958, when he bought this house. He couldn’t sail, he didn’t like the beach and he sunburned badly, James E. B. Breslin noted in Mark Rothko: A Biography. In 1963, Rothko sold this place to the artists Tony Vevers (1926-2008) and Elspeth Halvorsen. By then, Vevers was well established, having had a solo show at the seminal Sun Gallery in 1958. He was one of the founders of the Long Point Gallery and was deeply involved in the Provincetown Art Association and Museum. In the 2008 Provincetown Arts, the artist Tabitha Vevers said of the Bradford Street studio, “It was where my father’s enduring love of life, and the sometimes humble beauty of the world around him, came together as art.”

250 Bradford Street

250 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

250 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

Though Mark Rothko is not commonly associated with Provincetown, he was indeed here for a few years, beginning in 1958, when he bought this house. He couldn’t sail, he didn’t like the beach and he sunburned badly, James Breslin noted in Mark Rothko: A Biography. In 1963, Rothko sold this place to the artists Tony Vevers and Elspeth Halvorsen. By then, Vevers was well established, having had a solo show at the seminal Sun Gallery in 1958. He was one of the founders of the Long Point Gallery and was deeply involved in the Provincetown Art Association and Museum. In Provincetown Arts, the artist Tabitha Vevers said this was “where my father’s enduring love of life, and the sometimes humble beauty of the world around him, came together as art.”


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.

252 Bradford Street

Mary Campbell, sister of Philip Alexander, was a “renowned chef” who converted 252 Bradford Street — built around 1850 in the Greek Revival style — into the Little Chowder Bowl restaurant, “famous for lobster bisque, clam chowder and fresh blueberry pies.” Be sure to see the comments below on the history of the house in recent decades. Read the comments»

256 Bradford Street

Long Point Post Office
The most important surviving civic building of the Long Point settlement, its Post Office, was built around 1830. What we see from the street was originally the rear of the structure. It lived a distinguished second life as the studio of the painter Herman Maril (1908-1986), whose work was championed in the 1930s by the collector Duncan Phillips. Maril acquired this property in the late 1950s and then, working with the artist Chester Pfeiffer, added a second-floor studio with north-facing windows, extending from the back of the house over a patio. Maril, Karl Knaths and Milton Avery collegially exchanged studio visits every summer, his widow Esta Maril recalled.

256 Bradford Street

256 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

256 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

Herman Maril's plan for his studio addition at 256 Bradford Street.

Herman Maril’s plan for his studio addition at 256 Bradford Street.

David Maril, by David W. Dunlap (2012).

David Maril, by David W. Dunlap (2012).

The most important surviving civic building from Long Point, its post office, was built around 1830. What we see from the street was originally the rear of the structure. Its distinguished second life was as the studio of the painter Herman Maril, whose work was championed by the collector Duncan Phillips. Maril, a professor at the University of Maryland, acquired this property in 1958. Working with the artist Chester Pfeiffer, he added a second-floor studio a year later, with north-facing windows, extending over a patio. (That’s Maril’s drawing of the project.) He died in 1986. His wife, Esta, a children’s psychiatric social worker, died in 2009. Their son David, a newspaperman and president of the Herman Maril Foundation, owns, uses, and cherishes the house. The studio is virtually untouched.


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.

258 Bradford Street

258 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

258 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

The connoisseurs speak: “Probably the most intact of the Capes,” said Eric Dray (whose own home can be seen in the distance). “A lovely and virtually perfectly preserved example of a turn-of-the-century Cape Cod summer cottage,” said Daniel Towler. The century in question is the 19th, because this handsome building dates to 1801, the Provincetown Historic Survey said. Its state of preservation may be credited, in some measure, to continuity of family ownership between 1914 and 1996: from W. Creighton and Isabelle Lee, to August and Gladys MacLeod (Isabelle Lee’s niece), to John and Isabel (MacLeod) Walker.


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.