301 Bradford Street

Linger-a-Long
One of the very few floaters to make it all the way to the East End, Linger-A-Long was built around 1820. When it was out at the edge of the sea, it belonged to Eldridge Smith, a founder of the Long Point settlement after the War of 1812. Smith’s grandson, Capt. Ed Walter Smith, earned his place in whaling legend by killing a 73-foot right whale in 1888. Beatrice Perry was living here in 1950 when her presence was noted as the only woman scalloper in Provincetown.

303 Bradford Street

Sea Glass

This condominium at the corner of Allerton and Bradford was constructed in 1970. In 2013, a two-bedroom condo unit was placed on the market for $549,000, through Lee Ash of William Raveis. • Historic District Survey (1) • Historic District Survey (2) • Assessor’s Online Database, Unit A • Assessor’s Online Database, Unit B ¶ Updated 2013-12-22

312-320 Bradford Street

The east and west lot lines of this property, if extended to the Atlantic, encompass the only privately-owned dune shack in the Cape Cod National Seashore. That’s because the property once did extend to the dune shack. Imagine: a house on Bradford Street with a back yard on the ocean! Both the shack and this family compound belong to the Malicoat clan, art-colony aristocracy, many of whom have lived or summered here. They include Florence (Bradshaw) Brown (±1870-1957); her daughter, the graphic artist Barbara Haven (Brown) Malicoat, who illustrated the Walking Tour booklets and is pictured at left with her husband, the painter Philip Cecil Malicoat (1908-1981), who studied with Charles W. Hawthorne and Henry Hensche, formed a triumvirate with Bruce McKain and George Yater, and bought this property.

Their son Conrad Malicoat, is a sculptor whose signature work is flowing brick chimneys and walls. His wife is Anne Lord and their daughters are Robena Malicoat, an artist who continues to use her grandfather Philip’s studio; Galen Malicoat and Bronwyn Malicoat. Conrad’s sister, Martha (Malicoat) Dunigan (±1934-2001); her husband, Philip Dunigan; and their daughters, Orin Dunigan, Breon Dunigan and Seanad Dunigan have also used the compound.


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312-320 Bradford Street

312-324 Bradford Street, Malicoat studio, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

312-324 Bradford Street, Malicoat studio, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

Conrad Malicoat, courtesy of Robena Malicoat.

Conrad Malicoat, courtesy of Robena Malicoat.

This bay-to-ocean “great lot,” encompassing the only privately-owned dune shack, belongs to the Brown-Malicoat-Dunigan clan, art-colony aristocracy. They include Harold Haven and Florence (Bradshaw) Brown; their daughter, the graphic artist Barbara Haven (Brown) Malicoat; and her husband, the painter Philip Malicoat, who studied with Hawthorne and Hensche, and bought this property. Barbara and Philip’s son Conrad was a sculptor whose signature was organically flowing brickwork, and their daughter Martha is an artist and teacher of fine art and sculpture. Conrad married Anne Lord. Their daughters are Robena, an artist who uses Philip’s studio (pictured), Galen, and Bronwyn. Martha married Philip Dunigan, a musician. Their daughters are Orin Barbara Dunigan, the artist Breon Dunigan, and the violist Seanad (Dunigan) Chang.


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.

313 Bradford Street

313 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

313 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

Arthur Cohen was one of the most prominent links in the chain binding Provincetown and the Art Students League of New York. He also studied with Edwin Dickinson at Cooper Union. Cohen — and his exquisitely understated landscapes — were part of the art scene for decades. His wife, the concert pianist Elizabeth Rodgers, was a frequent subject of his work. “He lived in the moment so intensely,” she told Deborah Minsky, writing in The Banner after his death in 2012. “Some of his paintings for me reflect a kind of peacefulness that he never had as a person but found when he looked at something.” The couple acquired this property in 1985. Their home (bottom) had been built by James Thomas as a workshop, then rigged up ingeniously by Cohen to serve a painter and a pianist. His own studio on this lot burned disastrously in 2008.

313 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2013).

313 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2013).


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.

313 Bradford Street

There is a great bond between Provincetown and the Art Students League of New York, and Arthur Cohen is one of the most prominent links in that chain. He was at the League in 1950 and again in 1960 (having already studied with Edwin Dickinson at Cooper Union), shortly before arriving in town for the first time. Cohen — and his exquisitely understated landscapes — have been part of the scene ever since. He is married to the concert pianist Elizabeth Rodgers, who is a frequent subject of his work. They acquired this property in 1985. Cohen’s studio burned in 2008, but he was in New York at the time.

324 Bradford Street


Eastwood at Provincetown

Robert W. Roman may have been the most unpopular man in Provincetown in the 1960s, as the developer of the Surfside Arms and Motor Inn at 543 Commercial Street. He began the Eastwood Motor Lodge project at around the time, but it seems to have generated much less controversy. More pictures and history»

350 Bradford Street

Michael Shay’s Rib and Seafood House

This is the breakfast club for a who’s who of old Provincetown. (Try the flippers and linguiça. You won’t have to eat again until tomorrow.) How did they arrive at “Michael Shay’s”? The name ought to be Santos, after the family that’s run the restaurants on this site since 1948, when Basil P. Santos and his wife, Gloria E. (Silva) Santos, opened the Captain’s Galley. In 1954, it became an orange-roofed Howard Johnson’s franchise, but prided itself as being a “rather unusual link” in the chain. More pictures and history»

350 Bradford Street

350 Bradford Street, Michael Shay's Rib and Seafood House, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

350 Bradford Street, Michael Shay’s Rib and Seafood House, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

As Michael Shay’s Rib and Seafood House, this was the breakfast club for a who’s who of old Provincetown. After flippers and linguiça here, you wouldn’t have to eat for another day. The Santos family ran restaurants on this site beginning in 1948, when Basil Santos and his wife, Gloria (Silva) Santos, opened the Captain’s Galley. In 1954, it became an orange-roofed Howard Johnson’s franchise, but prided itself as being a “rather unusual link” in the chain. (The HoJo steeple still exists, at Poor Richard’s Landing.) In the early ’80s, the HoJo connection faded as Basil’s Place emerged, along with the Greenery bar, later the Buttery Bar & Grille. Then came Michael Shay, named not for one person but two: Basil and Gloria’s son Michael Santos and his wife, Shay. From 2012 to 2014, the restaurant was called the Hot_l Bar & Grille.


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.