53 Bradford Street

At the Race Run Sporting Center, housed in this modest structure (c1940), “you could rent a bike, fix a flat, buy a hook and the bait to put on it, as well as get advice on where the bass and blues were running on any given day,” Susan Leonard said. The proprietors were Joseph Smith and his wife, Marilyn Smith. More recently, before moving to the old Eastern School, ArtStrand was here. More pictures and history »

54 Bradford Street

Shank Painter Condominium

The Shank Painter Condominium, as its name suggests, is oriented largely to Shank Painter Road, though it has the street address 54 Bradford Street. A small cottage colony has stood here since 1940. In the 1960s, was known as the Brown Cottages, which were evidently superintended by Clayton F. Enos (b 1927). A 1965 narcotics raid on the cottages netted 11 young men and women, one of whom was charged with “lewd and lascivious cohabitation.” Seventeen condo units were listed on this lot in 2008. In the late 1950s, a photo studio called Candids by Carter did business at 54 Bradford Street. The longtime commercial tenant of recent years is Salon 54. [Updated 2012-05-14]

67 Bradford Street

9 Court Street, the Captain's House of the Brass Key Guesthouse, 67 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

9 Court Street, the Captain’s House of the Brass Key Guesthouse, 67 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

The deluxe Brass Key Guesthouse has grown by accretion into a large compound. The expansion was the work of Michael MacIntyre and his husband, Bob Anderson, who died in 2004. They also refurbished Land’s End Inn. Thomas Walter, Kenneth Masi, and David Sanford, the owners of Crowne Pointe, acquired the property in 2007. It includes:

8 Carver Street, the Queen Anne House of the Brass Key Guesthouse, 67 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

8 Carver Street, the Queen Anne House of the Brass Key Guesthouse, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

¶ The Queen Anne House, 8 Carver Street. This eclectic confection was the Cottage Inn in the 19th century. It was later home to Moses Nickerson Gifford, president of the First National Bank and son of James Gifford, namesake of the hotel up the street. Andrew Turocy III bought the house in 1981 and operated it as Roomers.

10 Carver Street, the Victorian House of the Brass Key Guesthouse, 67 Bradford Street, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

10 Carver Street, the Victorian House of the Brass Key Guesthouse, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

¶ The Victorian House, 10 Carver Street, was built around 1865 in Second Empire style. It belonged to William Henry Young, the first president of the Provincetown Art Association and founder of what is now the Benson Young & Downs Insurance Agency. His wife, Anna (Hughes) Young, was a founder of the Research Club. It is for their son, Lewis A. Young, who died in World War I, that the Veterans of Foreign Wars post was named. Subsequent owners included Arthur and Martha (Alves) Roderick, who raised four children here before selling it in 1978.

¶ The Gatehouse and Shipwreck Lounge, 12 Carver Street, was home in the 1960s to Joseph and Virginia (Souza) Lewis, proprietors of the Pilgrim House. Lewis was a founder of the Portuguese-American Civic League. This building and 10 Carver were known together in the 1970s and ’80s as Haven House, run by Don Robertson.

Gus McCleod at George's Inn, by David Jarrett (1971).

Gus McCleod at George’s Inn, by David Jarrett (1971).

¶ The Captain’s House, 9 Court Street, was built in 1830 in the Federal style and is the most imposing building in the complex. It played an important role in the development of the gay and lesbian business community as George’s Inn, opened in 1964 by George Littrell. In the late ‘70s, it explicitly sought gay patrons only. Littrell was an early leader in the Provincetown Business Guild; in effect, the gay Chamber of Commerce. The inn closed in 1982. Littrell died in 2000.

67 Bradford Street

Brass Key Guesthouse

The deluxe Brass Key Guesthouse has 42 rooms and multiple entries, since it’s grown by accretion into a large compound. The expansion was the work of Michael MacIntyre and his husband, Bob Anderson, who died in 2004. (They also refurbished Land’s End Inn at 22 Commercial Street.) Thomas Walter, Kenneth Masi and David Sanford, the owners of Crowne Pointe Historic Inn and Spa, acquired the property in 2007. More pictures and history »

68 Bradford Street

Carl’s Guest House

Carl’s Guest House occupies a structure that was built between 1840 and 1860. It was known as the Ocean Breeze Guest House in the 1950s, but later returned to private use. Carl Gregor reopened the house to the public, with 14 guest rooms, on 14 July 1975. He still runs it, extending a special welcome to guests who are “gentler, friendly, easy going.” On town records, it carries the address of 17 Court Street. • Historic District SurveyAssessor’s Online Database ¶ Updated 2012-11-28

70 Bradford Street

Bradford-Carver House

Captain Joseph Enos ran the Bradford Market in this house (c1850) in the 1940s. Twenty years later, it was the home of Irving T. McDonald, author of a trilogy of books on life at Holy Cross College, broadcast on WEEI radio in Boston. He also taught a “Communist Conspiracy” course at Provincetown High School. Formerly Steele’s Guest House, it is now the Bradford-Carver House, with six rooms. More pictures »

70 Bradford Street

70 Bradford Street, the Bradford-Carver House, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

70 Bradford Street, the Bradford-Carver House, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

Capt. Joseph Enos ran the Bradford Market in this mid-19th-century house in the 1940s. Twenty years later, it was the home of Irving McDonald, who wrote three novels, intended for Catholic boys, that charted the adventures of Andy Carroll at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester. He taught a “Communist Conspiracy” course at P.H.S. The property was later Steele’s Guest House and is now the Bradford-Carver House, operated by Kenneth Nelson.