21 Atkins-Mayo Road

21 Atkins-Mayor Road, by David W. Dunlap (2013).

21 Atkins-Mayor Road, by David W. Dunlap (2013).

Romolo Del Deo, by David W. Dunlap (2013).

Romolo Del Deo, by David W. Dunlap (2013).

This is the home and studio of the sculptor and graphic artist Romolo Del Deo, whose Fishermen’s Memorial is intended for MacMillan Wharf, once the needed money is raised. His mother, Josephine (Couch) Del Deo, told me this house was probably built soon after the parcel was acquired in 1915 by Col. Francis Bacon Jones, who fought in the Civil War. His children were the artist Mary Bacon Jones, an important member of the Provincetown color woodblock group, and Russell Jones, who sold the property in 1928 to his brother-in-law, Shorb Floyd Jones. Josephine and Sal Del Deo, and Josephine’s mother, Osma Gallinger Tod, bought it in 1971. Romolo studied in Florence, Carrara, and Pietrasanta, and counts Dimitri Hadzi among his teachers. He’s owned this property since 1992.

31 Atkins-Mayo Road

Sal Del Deo in his studio, an out building at 31 Atkins-Mayo Road, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

Sal Del Deo in his studio, an out building at 31 Atkins-Mayo Road, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

The artist and restaurateur Salvatore Del Deo — namesake of both Ciro & Sal’s and Sal’s Place — has owned this property since 1955 with his wife, Josephine (Couch) Del Deo. She is the town historian emerita; a moving force behind the Cape Cod National Seashore, the Historic District, and the former Heritage Museum, and the author of Figures in a Landscape, a biography of Ross Moffett; and Compass Grass Anthology. In 1953, she married Sal, who had attended the Art Students League and the Vesper George School of Art in Boston before coming to town to study with Henry Hensche. His studio is a freestanding building out back. To design it, Del Deo told me, he measured the dimensions of studios used by Moffett, Philip Malicoat, Pauline Palmer, Max Bohm, Frederick Waugh, and Charles Hawthorne. The main house was originally the studio of Mary Bacon Jones.

Sal and Josephine Del Deo at home, 31 Atkins-Mayo Road, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

Sal and Josephine Del Deo at home, 31 Atkins-Mayo Road, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

56 Atkins-Mayo Road

56 Atkins-Mayo Road, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

56 Atkins-Mayo Road, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

This stout, angular box of a studio was built in the 1950s for Boris Margo, a Ukrainian native who emigrated to the United States in 1930 and married the artist Jan Gelb. They spent summers in a dune shack that still bears their names. “Margo pioneered new materials and techniques to create his biomorphic and lyrically abstract work,” Pamela Mandell wrote in On Equal Ground. In 1971, squatters started a fire that burned the studio down, though firemen did all they could to save the artwork. Margo and his nephew Murray Zimiles rebuilt in 1973. Since Margo’s death in 1995, the studio has been used by Zimiles and his niece, Dawn Zimiles, a painter and mixed-media artist.