5 Bradford Street Extension

5 Bradford Street Extension, the Moors, courtesy of the Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum.

5 Bradford Street Extension, the Moors, courtesy of the Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum.

Mylan Costa, courtesy of The Provincetown Banner.

Mylan Costa, courtesy of The Provincetown Banner.

Kind of cheesy but utterly beloved, the Moors was as much a town institution as a tourist destination. Maline Costa opened it in 1939. It burned in 1956 and was rebuilt in a month, filled with curios and memorabilia from neighbors and fishermen. You could get a drink in the Smugglers Jug Room or dine on Portuguese fare — “Combed from the Sea” — in the Old Shed. The Moors was a landmark on the gay social circuit for beachgoers returning from Herring Cove. Mylan Costa, Maline’s son, sold it in 1998. John and Kim Medeiros ran it for a while but it was demolished and replaced in 2004 by the Village at the Moors. The nearby motel of the same name now does business as the Inn at the Moors.

21 Bradford Street Extension

21 Bradford Street Extension, Herring Cove Village, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

21 Bradford Street Extension, Herring Cove Village, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

21 Bradford Street Extension, Herring Cove Tennis Club office, now demolished, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

21 Bradford Street Extension, Herring Cove Tennis Club office, now demolished, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

The Herring Cove Tennis Club, with five red-clay courts, was built in 1947 by Hawthorne Bissell and known for many years as Bissell’s Tennis Courts or the Cast Anchor Tennis Courts. This being Provincetown, the courts were also used in the late 1950s for John Kelly’s classes in Russian ballet. The four-acre property was acquired in 2006 by the developers Jim Watkins and Dave Krohn. In 2008, they began opening units of the Herring Cove Village condominium complex. The houses, by McMahon Architects, are punctuated by ersatz widow’s-walk cupolas. The landscape design is by David Berarducci. With the completion of the second phase in 2014, only two courts remain. The tennis building is gone.

29 Bradford Street Extension

29 Bradford Street Extension, Bill White's Motel, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

29 Bradford Street Extension, Bill White’s Motel, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

Bradford Street Extension was once motel alley. Bill White’s Motel was built in 1975 by William and Margaret White, who ran the place until John and Margaret Tinkham (Margaret White’s daughter) took over in 1994. The Explorer’s Guide said in 2003 that the 12-unit motel provided “arguably the best value in town” and that “the Portuguese hospitality is warm.” The property was acquired by John Gagliardi, who had previously operated the Copper Fox, and reopened in 2010 as the Foxberry Inn. White was a postman who had gone into the home-building business, Gagliardi told me, and did a “wonderful job” constructing the namesake motel himself.