5 Bradford Street Extension

5 Bradford Street Extension, the Moors, courtesy of the Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum.

5 Bradford Street Extension, the Moors, courtesy of the Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum.

Mylan Costa, courtesy of The Provincetown Banner.

Mylan Costa, courtesy of The Provincetown Banner.

Kind of cheesy but utterly beloved, the Moors was as much a town institution as a tourist destination. Maline Costa opened it in 1939. It burned in 1956 and was rebuilt in a month, filled with curios and memorabilia from neighbors and fishermen. You could get a drink in the Smugglers Jug Room or dine on Portuguese fare — “Combed from the Sea” — in the Old Shed. The Moors was a landmark on the gay social circuit for beachgoers returning from Herring Cove. Mylan Costa, Maline’s son, sold it in 1998. John and Kim Medeiros ran it for a while but it was demolished and replaced in 2004 by the Village at the Moors. The nearby motel of the same name now does business as the Inn at the Moors.

21 Bradford Street Extension

21 Bradford Street Extension, Herring Cove Village, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

21 Bradford Street Extension, Herring Cove Village, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

21 Bradford Street Extension, Herring Cove Tennis Club office, now demolished, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

21 Bradford Street Extension, Herring Cove Tennis Club office, now demolished, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

The Herring Cove Tennis Club, with five red-clay courts, was built in 1947 by Hawthorne Bissell and known for many years as Bissell’s Tennis Courts or the Cast Anchor Tennis Courts. This being Provincetown, the courts were also used in the late 1950s for John Kelly’s classes in Russian ballet. The four-acre property was acquired in 2006 by the developers Jim Watkins and Dave Krohn. In 2008, they began opening units of the Herring Cove Village condominium complex. The houses, by McMahon Architects, are punctuated by ersatz widow’s-walk cupolas. The landscape design is by David Berarducci. With the completion of the second phase in 2014, only two courts remain. The tennis building is gone.

29 Bradford Street Extension

29 Bradford Street Extension, Bill White's Motel, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

29 Bradford Street Extension, Bill White’s Motel, by David W. Dunlap (2009).

Bradford Street Extension was once motel alley. Bill White’s Motel was built in 1975 by William and Margaret White, who ran the place until John and Margaret Tinkham (Margaret White’s daughter) took over in 1994. The Explorer’s Guide said in 2003 that the 12-unit motel provided “arguably the best value in town” and that “the Portuguese hospitality is warm.” The property was acquired by John Gagliardi, who had previously operated the Copper Fox, and reopened in 2010 as the Foxberry Inn. White was a postman who had gone into the home-building business, Gagliardi told me, and did a “wonderful job” constructing the namesake motel himself.

105 Bradford Street Extension

105 Bradford Street Extension, the Chateau Provincetown, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

105 Bradford Street Extension, the Chateau Provincetown, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

Sprawled over a four-acre hilltop site, the sheer size of the 55-room Seaglass Inn and Spa — known previously as the Chateau Motel, Best Western Chateau Motor Inn and Chateau Provincetown — is unlike anything in town. Two generations of the Gordon family were involved: William and Emily (Prada) Gordon opened the motel in 1958 and expanded it. They were followed by their son, William Gordon Jr., and his wife, Charlotte. The Gordons proposed tearing down the motel in 2007 and converting the property into a 10-lot subdivision, but kept the Chateau ouvert until 2013, when they sold it to Nadine Licostie, a filmmaker, and her wife, Faith Licostie, an emergency-room nurse, who rechristened it Seaglass and reopened it in 2014.

144 Bradford Street Extension

144 Bradford Street Extension, the Galeforce Farm barn, courtesy of Allen Gallant.

144 Bradford Street Extension, the Galeforce Farm barn, courtesy of Allen Gallant.

144 Bradford Street Extension, Gale Force Bikes, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

144 Bradford Street Extension, Gale Force Bikes, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

Beach Market and Gale Force Bikes, a popular place to rent bicycles for the Cape Cod National Seashore trails, occupies the site of the main barn of Galeforce Farm, founded at the turn of the 20th century by Frank Silva Alves, a fisherman and native of Pico, in the Azores. In its early days, it was one of five dairy farms in town. Frank’s son, Joseph Alves, took over in 1934, installed pasteurization equipment in 1941, and increased the herd to more than three dozen Guernsey and Holstein cows. But a lack of farmhands and a spate of bad weather killed off Galeforce in 1952, by which time it was the last dairy farm at the Cape tip.

147 Bradford Street Extension

147 Bradford Avenue Extension, Galeforce Farm farmhouse, courtesy of Allen Gallant (1956).

147 Bradford Avenue Extension, Galeforce Farm farmhouse, courtesy of Allen Gallant (1956).

Raymond Alves and friends, courtesy of Allen Gallant.

Raymond Alves and friends, courtesy of Allen Gallant.

Allen Gallant, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

Allen Gallant, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

An ample farmhouse from the early 20th century still stands, and still commands a proprietor’s prospect over what was once dairy land. The main building of the Safe Harbor condominium at No. 147 was the home of Joseph Alves and Irene (Raymond) Alves, who ran Galeforce, the town’s last commercial dairy farm. Their son Raymond Alves sold the property in 1990 to his brother-in-law, Allen Gallant, who created the condo in 2005. Gallant’s husband, David Cox, is a pioneer in chronicling Provincetown from a drone’s-eye view.

Frank Fratus Square

Frank B. Fratus was one of eight Provincetown men killed in World War I. Two decades after the armistice, with another war looming in Europe, five of these men were memorialized in the renaming of five principal intersections: Manuel Lopes at Railroad Square, Everett McQuillan at Depot Square, Norman Cook at Town Hall Square and Louis Ferreira at Kelley’s Corner, also known — then and now — as the Turn. (“Vets to Dedicate Five Town Squares,” The Advocate, March 24, 1938.) Lewis A. Young had already been commemorated in the renaming of the Veterans of Foreign Wars post, while Antone Light and Lewis Morris were memorialized by the American Legion.

† 175 Bradford Street Extension

Alfred “Fall River” Perry, originally Perreira, opened the Wagon Wheels diner shortly after World War II, Joseph Andrews recalled. (Though it’s not a very clear reproduction, you can actually discern the wagon wheels flanking the stairway to the diner entrance.) It stood at the intersection now occupied by Victor’s, when this part of the West End was almost rural, given the presence nearby of the large Galeforce Farm.

175 Bradford Street Extension

175 Bradford Street Extension, Dairy Queen, courtesy of the Provincetown History Preservation Project (1987).

175 Bradford Street Extension, Dairy Queen, courtesy of the Provincetown History Preservation Project (1987).

Elmer Silva, courtesy of Provincetown High School.

Elmer Silva, courtesy of Provincetown High School.

Dairy Queen matchbook, courtesy of Salvador R. Vasques III.

Dairy Queen matchbook, courtesy of Salvador R. Vasques III.

Joe “The Barber” Ferreira opened “probably the only Dairy Queen franchise in America that served kale soup,” Amy Whorf McGuiggan wrote My Provincetown. It replaced the Wagon Wheels diner, run by Alfred “Fall River” Perry. The D.Q. was later owned by Elmer Silva, principal of Provincetown High School, who employed students like Yvonne Frazier, now a professional opera singer in Europe. It morphed into Silva’s Seafood Connection, run by Paul Silva and his brother, David Silva, a proprietor these days of the Red Inn. After turns as LiCata’s and the Beach Grill, it was razed by Victor DePoalo to make way for condos and Victor’s restaurant.

† 175 Bradford Street Extension

Alfred “Fall River” Perry was succeeded at this site by Joe “The Barber” Ferreira, who opened what was “probably the only Dairy Queen franchise in America that served kale soup,” Amy Whorf McGuiggan wrote. The DQ morphed into Silva’s Seafood Connection, whose spokesfish is seen in the picture, run in its last years by the brothers David Silva and Paul Silva. After turns as LiCata’s and the Beach Grill, it was razed to make way for condominiums and Victor’s restaurant.