143R Bradford Street Extension to 168-170 Bradford Street Extension

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Structure by structure, Building Provincetown 2020 is starting to take shape. It will eventually include every habitable building in town, as well as many sheds and studios; plus dozens of historical buildings that no longer exist; along with hundreds of vessels, past and present. Here is the link for the eight entries from 143R to 168-170 Bradford Street Extension.

88 Bradford Street Extension to 141 Bradford Street Extension

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Structure by structure, Building Provincetown 2020 is starting to take shape. It will eventually include every habitable building in town, as well as many sheds and studios; plus dozens of historical buildings that no longer exist; along with hundreds of vessels, past and present. Here is the link for the eight entries from 88 to 141 Bradford Street Extension.

21 Bradford Street Extension to 83 Bradford Street Extension

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Structure by structure, Building Provincetown 2020 is starting to take shape. It will eventually include every habitable building in town, as well as many sheds and studios; plus dozens of historical buildings that no longer exist; along with hundreds of vessels, past and present. Here is the link for the eight entries from 21 to 83 Bradford Street Extension.

31 Blueberry Avenue to 21 Bradford Street Extension

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Structure by structure, Building Provincetown 2020 is starting to take shape. It will eventually include every habitable building in town, as well as many sheds and studios; plus dozens of historical buildings that no longer exist; along with hundreds of vessels, past and present. Here is the link for the eight entries from 31 Blueberrry Avenue to 21 Bradford Street Extension.

5 Bradford Street Extension

5 Bradford Street Extension, the Moors, courtesy of the Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum.

5 Bradford Street Extension, the Moors, courtesy of the Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum.

Mylan Costa, courtesy of The Provincetown Banner.

Mylan Costa, courtesy of The Provincetown Banner.

Kind of cheesy but utterly beloved, the Moors was as much a town institution as a tourist destination. Maline Costa opened it in 1939. It burned in 1956 and was rebuilt in a month, filled with curios and memorabilia from neighbors and fishermen. You could get a drink in the Smugglers Jug Room or dine on Portuguese fare — “Combed from the Sea” — in the Old Shed. The Moors was a landmark on the gay social circuit for beachgoers returning from Herring Cove. Mylan Costa, Maline’s son, sold it in 1998. John and Kim Medeiros ran it for a while but it was demolished and replaced in 2004 by the Village at the Moors. The nearby motel of the same name now does business as the Inn at the Moors.