4 Brewster Street

Edwin Reeves Euler Building

Constructed in 1923 by the family of Frank Days Sr., owners of the lumberyard on Pearl Street where the Fine Arts Work Center evolved, 4 Brewster has been used ever since as housing and studio space for artists — like Jim Forsberg (1919-1991), Ross Moffett (1888-1971), Robert Motherwell (1915-1991), Seong Moy, Jim Peters, Myron Stout (1908-1987) and George Yater (1910-1993). The artist Edwin Reeves Euler (1896-1982) bought it in 1945 and, with Frances Euler, operated it as Euler Studios. More pictures and history»

4 Brewster Street

4 Brewster Street, Edwin Reeves Euler Building, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

4 Brewster Street, Edwin Reeves Euler Building, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

4 Brewster Street, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

4 Brewster Street, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

Constructed in 1923 by the family of Frank Days Sr., owners of the lumberyard on Pearl Street where the Fine Arts Work Center evolved, 4 Brewster has been used ever since as housing and studio space for artists like Jim Forsberg, Ross Moffett, Seong Moy, Jim Peters, Myron Stout, and George Yater. The artist Edwin Reeves Euler bought it in 1945 and, with Frances Euler, operated it as Euler Studios. After Euler died, his niece, Lynn Olsen, and her husband, Ben Olsen, continued to run it as artists’ housing. The Fine Arts Work Center acquired it in 1997 for the purpose of preserving affordable units. There are eight apartments in what is now called the Edwin Reeves Euler Building.


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.

8 Brewster Street

Capt. Louis Cordeiro Jr., by Bill Berardi, courtesy of Gordon Ferreira and Susan Leonard.

Capt. Louis Cordeiro Jr., by Bill Berardi, courtesy of Gordon Ferreira and Susan Leonard.

8 Brewster Street, by David W. Dunlap (2013).

8 Brewster Street, by David W. Dunlap (2013).

Trap fishermen built off-shore structures called weirs; fenced enclosures, with no way out, into which fish headed at lowering tides. Once ensnared, they would be taken by men in trapboats. Louis Cordeiro Jr. may go down as the last surviving trap fisherman — he died in 2005 — but his family joked that he was also the “land baron of Brewster Street,” owning five buildings at No. 8 and No. 10. His father had arrived around 1910 from São Miguel in the Azores. Louis Jr. married Charlotte Perry in 1942. Four years later, they bought this property, which has a main house and a gambrel-roofed cottage. It passed to their son Raymond and his wife, Madelyn, who sold it in 2007. Their son, Brandon Raymond Prezioso Cordeiro, is an up-and-coming actor and writer. [Photo of Cordeiro by Bill Berardi, from the collection of Gordon Ferreira, courtesy of Susan Leonard.]


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.

10 Brewster Street

10 Brewster Street, by David W. Dunlap (2013).

10 Brewster Street, by David W. Dunlap (2013).

Susan Leonard and Rosemary Hillard, 10 Brewster Street, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

Susan Leonard and Rosemary Hillard, 10 Brewster Street, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

The northern half of Louis Cordeiro’s Brewster Street colony is still in the hands of the Cordeiro family. The shed-like building with a second-story deck began in the Beach Point section of North Truro as two cottages, known as Fore and Aft. They were brought here and united by a second story. Current residents include the artist and poet Rosemary Hillard and her partner Susan Leonard, among the leading local historians of the current generation. She’s been instrumental in capturing the soon-to-be-lost stories of the Portuguese community and preserving them in the annual Provincetown Portuguese Festival booklet. The old Fore-and-Aft building is not the only Truro import on Brewster; No. 27 was shipped up here on flat cars shortly after the Old Colony Railroad reached Provincetown in 1873.


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.

22 Brewster Street

22 Brewster Street, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

22 Brewster Street, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

Talk about paintings lining the walls! After Louis Lima and Jerome Crepeau bought this house in 2002, they discovered 130 works on Upton board — many of them impressionistic “mudhead” portrait studies — nailed in the wall cavities as insulation. They underscored the building’s use by Henry Hensche, whose Cape School of Art was quartered at 44-48 Pearl; then by James Kirk Merrick, a student of Hensche’s; then by Lois Griffel, a Hensche student who continued the school until 2000. Lima and Crepeau salvaged all but six paintings, which they left in situ as artistic Easter eggs, for the pleasure of a future owner to discover. The owners since 2009 have been Paul Kelly and Edward Dusek, principals in Manitou Architects, whose renovations uncovered evidence that the building started as a farm outbuilding, then was converted into north-facing studios.


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.

22 Brewster Street

Talk about paintings lining the walls! Here, they really did. After Louis Lima and Jerome Crepeau bought this barnlike house in 2002 and their renovation contractors began tearing out interior walls, they discovered 130 paintings on Upton board — many of them impressionistic “mudhead” portrait studies — nailed to the outside walls as insulation. These were a tangible reminder of the building’s history as a studio used by Henry Hensche (1901-1992), arguably first among equals of the disciples of Charles W. Hawthorne; then by James Kirk Merrick (1905-1985), a student of Hensche’s; and then by Lois Griffel, another Hensche student, who continued his Cape Cod School of Art nearby until 2000. Lima and Crepeau salvaged all but six of the paintings, which they left in situ as artistic Easter eggs, for the pleasure of a future owner to discover.

23 Brewster Street

23 Brewster Street, Lillian Orlowsky and William Freed studio, by David W. Dunlap (2013).

23 Brewster Street, Lillian Orlowsky and William Freed studio, by David W. Dunlap (2013).

"Still Life (By the Sea)," by Lillian Orlowsky, courtesy of the Provincetown Art Association and Museum.

“Still Life (By the Sea),” by Lillian Orlowsky, courtesy of the Provincetown Art Association and Museum.

For more than half of a century – much of that time here – Lillian Orlowsky and William Freed shared their lives and their evolution as abstract artists. They “left a strong stamp, both socially and artistically, on the art worlds of New York and Provincetown,” The Boston Globe said in 2008. Orlowsky learned of Hans Hofmann’s school while waiting to pick up her check as a W.P.A. artist in Manhattan. She and Freed studied with Hofmann and worked at Days Lumber Yard until 1959, when they built their own studio at No. 23. Freed died in 1984, Orlowsky 20 years later. Every year, through the Provincetown Art Association and Museum, the Lillian Orlowsky and William Freed Foundation awards grants to painters aged 45 and older with financial needs.


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.

23 Brewster Street


For more than half of a century – much of that time here – Lillian Orlowsky (1914-2007) and William Freed (1904-1984) shared their lives and their evolution as abstract artists. They “left a strong stamp, both socially and artistically, on the art worlds of New York and Provincetown,” The Boston Globe said in 2008. More history»

27 Brewster Street

Houses move around town all the time; they are unnervingly peripatetic. But this house moved to 27 Brewster Street all the way from Truro, not long after the Old Colony Railroad was extended to the cape tip in 1873. It was built around 1850 by Mr. Hamilton, “one of the pillars of the Truro Congregational Church. One Sunday after service he announced to his family that, due to dissension in the church, it was impossible to continue living in Truro. He sawed his house into four sections, had it carried to Provincetown on railway flat cars and reassembled it.” He also imported locust trees from Truro.