4 Center Street

Safe bet: if you came across this wild, woolly, in-your-face sculpture garden and were asked which of the town’s shopkeepers made his home here, you would probably guess, “It must be the guy who runs the wild, woolly, in-your-face Shop Therapy.” And you would be right. This is indeed where Ronny Hazel lives. Built around 1870, 4 Center Street served originally as the parsonage for the Center Methodist Episcopal Church across the street (now the Public Library). Hazel bought the property in 1991. “The garden is now full of sculptures so striking that some tourists think it’s an art museum,” Boston Spirit said in 2008. “And it kind of is.” Hazel told The Boston Globe in 2008 that he’s counted up to 20 visitors at a time gathered outside. “‘Oh, look at that, honey! Oh, did you see that?’ Not just one voice, like 10 voices. It’s so cool. You just want to tape it.” More pictures and history»

4 Center Street

"Living Image," by Pierre Riche, at 4 Center Street, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

“Living Image,” by Pierre Riche, at 4 Center Street, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

Ronny Hazel, by Joey Mars.

Ronny Hazel, by Joey Mars.

Safe bet: if you came across this wild, woolly, in-your-face sculpture garden and were asked which shopkeeper lived here, you would guess, “The guy who runs the wild, woolly, in-your-face Shop Therapy.” Correct. This is indeed the home of Ronny Hazel. Built around 1870, No. 4 served originally as the parsonage for the Center Methodist Episcopal Church across the street, now the Public Library. The last parson to live here was the Rev. Gilman Lewis Lane, who left in 1965. The building was sold to Irving Baff and Harold Hersh — also known as Mr. Kenneth, the milliner. Hazel bought it in 1991. Peter Annese of Stone by Columbus began building a wall that just kept growing, eventually framing abundant gardens that are settings for some very large sculptures, including Living Image, a 10-foot-long gryphonlike creature by Pierre Riche.


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.

5 Center Street

Rose Acre

A path behind the Public Library leads to Rose Acre, a four-room guest house, run for women by women (Rosemarie A. Basile and Carol J. Noyes). The building was constructed around 1840. Capt. Loring A. Russell Sr., owner of the fishing vessel Loretta R., bought the house in 1952 and lived there several decades with his wife, Etta Robar Russell. “He owned the Provincetown Ice Company in his early years,” The Banner said in a 2004 obituary, “but his greatest love was the sea, and his proudest profession was that of fishing boat captain.” More history»

7 Center Street

 
Heritage House

Heritage House is a four-bedroom bed-and-breakfast operated Lynn Mogell, an artist and Web designer, and her wife, Sarah K. Peake, who serves as the State Representative for the Fourth Barnstable district, comprising Provincetown, Chatham, Eastham, Harwich, Orleans, Truro and Wellfleet. True to its name, the house claims a considerable heritage, having been constructed in 1856 for Timothy Prosperous Johnson. Its large size was appropriate to the mission of sheltering 10 children. It was later the home of William Wilson Taylor, who personified — until his death in 1954 — Provincetown’s days as a whaling capital. More pictures and history»

7 Center Street

7 Center Street, Heritage House, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

7 Center Street, Heritage House, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

State Rep. Sarah Peake, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

State Rep. Sarah Peake, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

Heritage House is a four-bedroom bed-and-breakfast operated by Lynn Mogell, an artist and web designer, and Sarah Peake, the State Representative for Provincetown, Chatham, Eastham, Harwich, Orleans, Truro, and Wellfleet. True to its name, the house claims a considerable heritage, having been constructed in 1856 for Timothy Prosperous Johnson. It was later the home of William Wilson Taylor, who had shipped on the whaler Rising Sun and later ran Taylor’s Restaurant at 309 Commercial. He also kept law and order on Town Wharf, when it was lacking both. By the late 1980s, the Heritage House had been established. Mogell and Peake purchased it in 1993. Peake was elected to the Board of Selectmen in 2002. Two years later, she and Mogell were among the first same-sex couples to be issued marriage licenses by the town. She won her legislative seat in 2006.


Aaron Rosenberg wrote on 24 December 2016: I was a “houseboy” at the Heritage House for two months in the summer of 1987. At the time, the owner was a guy named Bob Kulesza. I didn’t see his name in the history of the house, so I thought I’d mention it. I was the second houseboy to be hired that summer, so I slept on a cot in the unfinished basement. Not very pleasant quarters, but a great two months just the same.


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.

12 Center Street

12 Center Street, Tucker Inn, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

12 Center Street, Tucker Inn, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

Howard Burchman, who runs the Tucker Inn with his partner, Thomas Kinard, believes he may have been imprinted with the innkeeping gene. “I was conceived while my parents were running a small hotel in the Catskills,” he said. The mansard-roofed house, in the Second Empire style, was constructed in 1872. By 1910, it was home to the Bowley family, which produced George Bowley, a superintendent in the Life-Saving Service and Rear Adm. Clarence Matheson Bowley, a decorated World War II hero. Admiral Bowley sold the property in 1974. It was later run by Linda Allen and Roger Allen, as the Twelve Center Guest House.

Denise Karas and her wife Katherine L. Bishop owned the property from 1995 to 1998. “We are the ones who named it the Tucker Inn and designed the sign and the stained-glass doors,” Karas told me in 2017. “We redesigned the entire house and added bathrooms and other amenities. We were also members of the Women Innkeepers [of Provincetown] group that organized Women’s Week.” So what does “Tucker” have to do with Karas and Bishop? “We made up the name of Captain Miles B. Tucker, who advanced from a cabin boy to captain without anyone suspecting that he was a she. When ‘he’ got into ports of call, all the women from the town would descend upon the ship to welcome ‘him’ and have a lovely ‘tea dance’ in her honor!” Provincetown innkeepers probably have racier anecdotes to tell than their counterparts in other small towns. “One of our funniest ones was the day we went in to freshen a guest room and tried to push in a drawer only to have the drawer front fall off,” Karas recalled. “In our attempt to secure it, we exposed a drawer full of feather boas, masks, whips and toys.  The women who were in this room were in their 60s and looked like two nuns. Kathy kept whispering, ‘Don’t touch anything!'”

The next owners, from 1998 to 2001, were Emily Flax and Carol Lynn Neal. Burchman, a human services consultant to government and nonprofit organizations who also managed the Ranch Guestlodge, took over in 2001.


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.

12 Center Street

 
Tucker Inn

Howard B. Burchman, who runs the Tucker Inn with his partner, Thomas Kinard, believes he may have been imprinted with the innkeeping gene. “I was conceived while my parents were running a small hotel in the Catskills,” he said. The distinctive mansard-roofed house, in the Second Empire style, is currently laid out with eight guest rooms. There is also a freestanding guest cottage. It was constructed in 1872. By 1910, it had become home to the Bowley family, which produced a decorated naval hero in Rear Admiral Clarence Matheson Bowley. Continue reading