4 Kiley Court

4 Kiley Court, Ciro & Sal's, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

4 Kiley Court, Ciro & Sal’s, by David W. Dunlap (2014).

Ciriaco “Ciro” Cozzi was a leading figure in the art colony’s post-war renaissance, not just because of his paintings but because of Ciro & Sal’s, the Northern Italian restaurant he and Sal Del Deo opened in 1954, when Kiley Court was still Peter Hunt’s Lane. Some of the town’s most important artists, like Varujan Boghosian, worked here. And when I say everyone ate here, I mean everyone — from John Wayne to John Waters. In 1960, Cozzi protected one of his waiters from a purge of homosexuals by the town’s police chief. He started an epicurean market, La Dispensa di Ciro, in the ’60s; purchased the Flagship; and opened restaurants in Boston and Orleans, stretching himself too thin. The business was sold in 2000 to Anne Packard, Cynthia Packard, and Larry Luster, who had worked for Cozzi more than 30 years. Cynthia and Larry’s son, the artist Zachary Luster, is the current manager.


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.

4 Kiley Court

4 Kiley Court, Provincetown (2010), by David W. Dunlap. 
Ciro and Patti Cozzi, Provincetown (2012), by Kristin Hein. Courtesy of Kristin Hein.Ciro & Sal’s

On Valentine’s Day 2013, Provincetown lost part of its heart with the death, at 91, of Ciriaco G. “Ciro” Cozzi (b 1921), one of the leading figures in the art colony’s post-war renaissance. It was not his paintings that placed him in the pantheon. It was the Italian restaurant that he and Salvatore Del Deo opened in 1954 in a house on Kiley Court. Cozzi bought the building in 1953 because — with three small children in tow — he couldn’t find anyone who’d rent to him. His new property came with a dirt-floor cellar that cried out for a money-generating use. So Ciro & Sal’s was born, as an informal dining spot for fishermen and artists. In time, it became the place to see and be seen. Norman Mailer, for instance, was a longtime regular. “Some of the best Italian cooking I’ve enjoyed,” he said in 1987, “hearty, traditional and yet full of the surprises of truly rare dishes.” And that was Cozzi’s goal, said Matt Tudor, a chef who trained under him and recalled Cozzi declaring: “Every dish should be saltimbocca — jump into the mouth.” More pictures and history»

5 Kiley Court

5 Kiley Court, Provincetown (2008), by David W. Dunlap. 
5 Kiley Court, Provincetown (2010), by David W. Dunlap.Daniel Cleary Studio

The little compound opposite Ciro & Sal’s was once part of Peter Hunt’s Peasant Village. In the 1950s and ’60s, it was owned by Edward Dicks and Forrest L. Dustin of New York. Daniel Cleary, a men’s clothing designer, has his studio here. The property has been owned since 1994 by members of Ciriaco G. “Ciro” Cozzi’s extended family. Stephen Cozzi, a nephew of the late artist and restaurateur, purchased 5 Kiley Court in 2005. More pictures and history»

8 Kiley Court

8 Kiley Court, Romanos Rizk studio, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

8 Kiley Court, Romanos Rizk studio, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

Firefighter saving a Romanos Rizk painting during the February 2015 blaze, by Daniel Gómez Llata.

Firefighter saving a Romanos Rizk painting during the February 2015 blaze, by Daniel Gómez Llata.

Like his next-door neighbors on Kiley Court, Sal Del Deo and Ciro Cozzi, Romanos Rizk came to town in the 1940s to study with Henry Hensche. He had a turn working at Ciro & Sal’s, as a cook. But he quit to devote himself to his art. “The only reason I don’t sell enough paintings is because I don’t have faith,” he said. “If I devote myself to painting, the paintings will sell.” Rizk was a native of Providence, born to Lebanese parents, who was strongly influenced by Asian art. His wife, Grace Rizk, an artisan in her own right, bought this property from Florence Kenney in 1958. During one of the hardest winters in memory, in February 2015, the 93-year-old Mrs. Rizk was rescued from a dreadful fire here by Police Officer Christopher Landry. Firefighters streamed in from around the lower Cape, saving what they could of Rizk’s canvases.


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.

8 Kiley Court

8 Kiley Court, Provincetown (2008), by David W. Dunlap. 
Painting by Romanos Rizk. Courtesy of the Provincetown Art Association and Museum.Romanos Rizk Studio

Like his next-door neighbors on Kiley Court, Sal Del Deo and Ciro Cozzi, Raymond Romanos Rizk (1927-2009) had come to Provincetown in the 1940s to study with Henry Hensche. And like Del Deo and Cozzi, he even had a turn working at Ciro & Sal’s, as a cook. But he quit to devote himself to his art. “The only reason I don’t sell enough paintings is because I don’t have faith,” he said. “If I don’t work, the paintings will sell. If I devote myself to painting, the paintings will sell.” More pictures and history»