8 Miller Hill Road

8 Miller Hill Road, Provincetown (2008), by David W. Dunlap. 
"Shooting for Istanbul," by Fritz Bultman (ND). Provincetown Art Association and Museum.Bultman home and studio

“Radiant” was the word Robert Motherwell used to describe the work of Anthony Frederick “Fritz” Bultman III (1919-1985), a painter and sculptor who once stood among the front ranks of the Abstract Expressionists — indeed, was one of the “Irascibles” whose 1950 protest letter to the Metropolitan Museum caused an uproar in art circles. Later, forever independent, he turned to luminous collages whose joie de vivre summoned the legacy of Matisse. Collaborating with his wife, Jeanne (Lawson) Bultman (±1918-2008), he turned some of those collages into brilliant stained-glass windows, including the one shown below in the house the Bultmans shared off Miller Hill Road. The nearby studio, pictured above, is an artwork in its own right; designed and built by the Minimalist sculptor Anthony Peter “Tony” Smith (1912-1980).

8 Miller Hill Road, Provincetown (2010), by David W. Dunlap. 

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8 Miller Hill Road

8 Miller Hill Road, Bultman studio, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

8 Miller Hill Road, Bultman studio, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

“Radiant” was how Robert Motherwell described the work of Fritz Bultman, a painter and sculptor from New Orleans in the front ranks of the Abstract Expressionists. He met Hans Hofmann in Munich in 1935. Two years later, having followed Hofmann to Chicago, he met the Minimalist sculptor Tony Smith. In 1938, he set out to Provincetown to study with Hofmann, who was teaching in Hawthorne’s Class Studio on Miller Hill.

Fritz Bultman, courtesy of Ellis Johann and Bethany Bultman.

Fritz Bultman, courtesy of Ellis Johann and Bethany Bultman.

Jeanne Bultman, courtesy of Ellis Johann and Bethany Bultman.

Jeanne Bultman, courtesy of Ellis Johann and Bethany Bultman.

There, Bultman met Jeanne Lawson. They were wed in 1943, after which they acquired this sprawling property. Smith designed a studio for Bultman that is one of the finest works of Modernist architecture in town. It was first used for Hofmann’s summer school in 1945. Five years later, Bultman was among the 28 “Irascibles” — Hofmann, Motherwell, Weldon Kees, Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko were others — who boycotted a juried show at the Metropolitan Museum, charging that the museum had failed to recognize “advanced art.”

8 Miller Hill Road, Bultman home, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

8 Miller Hill Road, Bultman home, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

Later, Bultman turned to luminous collages that recall Matisse. Collaborating with Jeanne, he turned collages into stained-glass windows like one in their home. Jeanne was active in founding the Fine Arts Work Center, Fritz in the founding of the Long Point Gallery co-operative. The property is owned today by their son Ellis Johann Bultman and his wife, Bethany (Ewald) Bultman, founders of the New Orleans Musicians’ Clinic and New Orleans Musicians Assistance Foundation. In recent years, Bultman’s studio has been used by the painter Rob DuToit, who is represented by Gallery Ehva. Bultman’s estate is represented by the Albert Merola Gallery.

And the Met? It now has four Bultmans.


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.

9 Miller Hill Road

9 Miller Hill Road, Provincetown (2010), by David W. Dunlap. 
"Charles Webster Hawthorne," by Albin Polasek (1932), Provincetown Art Association and Museum. Photograph (2012), by David W. Dunlap.Hawthorne house

Two significant properties on Miller Hill are connected with the painter Charles W. Hawthorne (1872-1930), who is credited — above all others — with having been the force of nature responsible for the transformation of Provincetown into an artists’ colony in the early 20th century. There is his barnlike class studio building, which still stands at 25 Miller Hill Road, and this structure — also gambrel-roofed — that was the home he shared with his wife, Marion Campbell Hawthorne (d 1945), a respected painter in her own right, and their son Joseph “Jo” Hawthorne (d 1994), an accomplished conductor nationally in the mid-20th century and the founder, in 1955, of the Provincetown Symphony Society and Provincetown Symphony Orchestra.

9 Miller Hill Road, Provincetown (±1927). Scrapbooks of Althea Boxell: Book 1, Page 29. Courtesy of the Provincetown History Preservation Project (Dowd Collection). 

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14 Miller Hill Road

No picture yetLaurel and Vincent Guadazno, Provincetown, by David W. Dunlap.Until 1966, this was home to the Viera family, including Mary Fratus (Perry) Viera (±1865-1937), who was born on Pico in the Azores; and her children Frank Joseph Viera Jr., a maintenance man, and Joseph Viera, who worked at a sand company, and their sister, Eugenia L. (Viera) Elliot, who worked at the New York Store for more than 45 years and sold the house in 1966 to Edward and Ella Lindsay. The property was purchased in 1977 by Laurel K. Guadazno (b 1947), who shares it with her husband, Vincent Guadazno (b 1942). The Guadaznos routinely touch the lives of almost every resident and visitor. Laurel, an alumna of the Vermont College of Fine Arts, is a longtime staff member at the Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum. More history»

18 Miller Hill Road

18 Miller Hill Road, Provincetown (2008), by David W. Dunlap.Milhil Condominium

In 2012, 45 percent of the full-time residents on Miller Hill Road lived in one single property: the 13-unit Milhil Condominium complex, constructed in 1984. The mean age is 60 here; the median is 59. Residents include Peter N. Edmonds (b 1946), proprietor of the dependably imaginative Mad as a Hatter hat store at 360 Commercial Street. More information»

25 Miller Hill Road

25 Miller Hill Road, Provincetown (2011), by David W. Dunlap. 
25 Miller Hill Road, Provincetown (2011), by David W. Dunlap.Hawthorne Class Studio

If the Provincetown artists’ colony can be said to have a birthplace — that is, something more structural than the dunes and tidal flats and cape light — this is the place. It is the Class Studio built in 1907 by the painter Charles Webster Hawthorne (1872-1930) to accommodate the growing number of students in his Cape Cod School of Art. Though his own house, at 9 Miller Hill Road, was intended for that purpose, the school quickly outgrew it. (Distinct properties now, the two were once part of a common parcel running from Bradford Street almost to the New Haven Railroad tracks.)

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29 Miller Hill Road

29 Miller Hill Road, the Hawthorne Class Studio, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

29 Miller Hill Road, the Hawthorne Class Studio, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

Albin Polasek’s “Charles Webster Hawthorne,” by David W. Dunlap (2012).

If the Provincetown artists’ colony can be said to have a birthplace — that is, something more structural than the dunes and tidal flats and Cape light — this is the place. It is the Class Studio, built in 1907 by the painter Charles Webster Hawthorne to accommodate the growing number of students in his Cape Cod School of Art. Though his own house at No. 9 was intended for that purpose, the school quickly outgrew it. Distinct parcels now, the two were once part of common acreage. Among many students (Dickinson, Euler, Hensche, Malicoat, McKain, Moffett, Yater), a name that shouldn’t be lost is that of William Henry Johnson, one of the more important African-American artists of the 20th century. Hawthorne died in 1930.

29 Miller Hill Road, the Hawthorne Class Studio, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

29 Miller Hill Road, the Hawthorne Class Studio, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

Hans Hofmann took the building over in 1934. Robert De Niro Sr. studied here. Hofmann lost the lease in 1944 and was succeeded by Morris Davidson and his wife, Anne. Davidson’s School of Modern Painting (later the School of Contemporary Painting) lasted until the ’70s. He died in 1979, a year after the building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. The next breath of artistic life came with the Pop artist Peter Gee and his wife, Olga Opsahl-Gee. In 1994, they opened the Hawthorne School of Art, whose chief draw was Gee’s color workshop. He died in 2005, leaving her to run the school until 2008.

Olga Opsahl-Gee, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

Olga Opsahl-Gee, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

Joshua Prager, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

Joshua Prager, by David W. Dunlap (2011).

The Class Studio was purchased in 2009 by Joshua Prager, a journalist and author, who envisioned it as the centerpiece of an artists’ residency program called Twenty Summers. In 2012, Prager sold the building to Adam Moss, the editor-in-chief of New York magazine, and his partner, Daniel Kaizer. They, in turn, rent the barn to Prager for one month a year. His programs, which began in 2014, open the studio to “story-telling, theater, music, literature, and, of course, art.” Moss and Kaizer own an abutting 19th-century house (also on the National Register) that was dragged up the hill from the town center, according to the Davidsons’ granddaughter, Lucinda Rosenfeld. The couple has engaged Richard “Rick” Wrigley to design two more houses at No. 25.

27 Miller Hill Road, the Round Barn, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

27 Miller Hill Road, the Round Barn, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

Opsahl-Gee broke off a parcel at No. 27 where two identical new town houses stand. This was the site of the Round Barn, which was among several distinctive — “zany” may be a better word — classroom buildings of the Hawthorne School. The structure, reportedly a mid-19th-century apple barn, was trucked here from New York State.


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.

† 27 Miller Hill Road

27 Miller Hill Road, Provincetown (2008), by David W. Dunlap. 
Olga Opsahl-Gee, 27 Miller Hill Road, Provincetown (2008), by David W. Dunlap.Round Barn (Hawthorne School of Art)

The Round Barn was among the several distinctive — “zany” might actually be a better adjective — out buildings scattered around the campus of the Hawthorne School of Art. The school was opened in 1994 at 25 Miller Hill Road, to which this lot was once joined, by the Pop artist Peter Gee (1932-2005) and his wife, Olga Opsahl-Gee (b 1945). She is seen at right adjusting one of the outdoor sculptures in 2008, the last year of the school’s existence. The structure itself was not a Provincetown native but was reportedly trucked here from New York State, where it had been built in the mid-19th century as an apple barn. More pictures and history»

27 Miller Hill Road

27 Miller Hill Road, Provincetown (2011), by David W. Dunlap.Rose Hill Condominium

In 2009, these identical twins replaced the Round Barn of the Hawthorne School of Art, which formerly stood at 27 Miller Hill Road. The application was made by the engineer William N. Rogers II and Olga Opsahl-Gee, who founded the school at 25 Miller Hill Road with her husband, Peter Gee, in 1994 and tried to continue it after his death. More history»

29 Miller Hill Road

29 Miller Hill Road, Provincetown (2008), by David W. Dunlap. 
29 Miller Hill Road, Provincetown (2008), by David W. Dunlap.Morris Davidson (1898-1979) landed at Provincetown in 1919 to study with George Elmer Browne, then returned for his honeymoon in 1927. He and his wife, Anne, purchased Charles W. Hawthorne’s property in 1944, which then included the Class Studio at 25 Miller Hill Road and “an early 19th-century Cape Cod-style house that had been dragged up from the town center,” their granddaughter, Lucinda Rosenfeld, wrote. She added that the house was one of those that had been floated over on scows from Long Point. The Morris Davidson School of Modern Painting (later to be called the Morris Davidson School of Contemporary Painting) was open for business. More pictures and history»