8 Miller Hill Road

8 Miller Hill Road, Provincetown (2008), by David W. Dunlap. 
"Shooting for Istanbul," by Fritz Bultman (ND). Provincetown Art Association and Museum.Bultman home and studio

“Radiant” was the word Robert Motherwell used to describe the work of Anthony Frederick “Fritz” Bultman III (1919-1985), a painter and sculptor who once stood among the front ranks of the Abstract Expressionists — indeed, was one of the “Irascibles” whose 1950 protest letter to the Metropolitan Museum caused an uproar in art circles. Later, forever independent, he turned to luminous collages whose joie de vivre summoned the legacy of Matisse. Collaborating with his wife, Jeanne (Lawson) Bultman (±1918-2008), he turned some of those collages into brilliant stained-glass windows, including the one shown below in the house the Bultmans shared off Miller Hill Road. The nearby studio, pictured above, is an artwork in its own right; designed and built by the Minimalist sculptor Anthony Peter “Tony” Smith (1912-1980).

8 Miller Hill Road, Provincetown (2010), by David W. Dunlap. 

More pictures and history»

8 Miller Hill Road

8 Miller Hill Road, Bultman studio, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

8 Miller Hill Road, Bultman studio, by David W. Dunlap (2008).

“Radiant” was how Robert Motherwell described the work of Fritz Bultman, a painter and sculptor from New Orleans in the front ranks of the Abstract Expressionists. He met Hans Hofmann in Munich in 1935. Two years later, having followed Hofmann to Chicago, he met the Minimalist sculptor Tony Smith. In 1938, he set out to Provincetown to study with Hofmann, who was teaching in Hawthorne’s Class Studio on Miller Hill.

Fritz Bultman, courtesy of Ellis Johann and Bethany Bultman.

Fritz Bultman, courtesy of Ellis Johann and Bethany Bultman.

Jeanne Bultman, courtesy of Ellis Johann and Bethany Bultman.

Jeanne Bultman, courtesy of Ellis Johann and Bethany Bultman.

There, Bultman met Jeanne Lawson. They were wed in 1943, after which they acquired this sprawling property. Smith designed a studio for Bultman that is one of the finest works of Modernist architecture in town. It was first used for Hofmann’s summer school in 1945. Five years later, Bultman was among the 28 “Irascibles” — Hofmann, Motherwell, Weldon Kees, Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko were others — who boycotted a juried show at the Metropolitan Museum, charging that the museum had failed to recognize “advanced art.”

8 Miller Hill Road, Bultman home, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

8 Miller Hill Road, Bultman home, by David W. Dunlap (2010).

Later, Bultman turned to luminous collages that recall Matisse. Collaborating with Jeanne, he turned collages into stained-glass windows like one in their home. Jeanne was active in founding the Fine Arts Work Center, Fritz in the founding of the Long Point Gallery co-operative. The property is owned today by their son Ellis Johann Bultman and his wife, Bethany (Ewald) Bultman, founders of the New Orleans Musicians’ Clinic and New Orleans Musicians Assistance Foundation. In recent years, Bultman’s studio has been used by the painter Rob DuToit, who is represented by Gallery Ehva. Bultman’s estate is represented by the Albert Merola Gallery.

And the Met? It now has four Bultmans.


More than 2,000 buildings and vessels are searchable on buildingprovincetown.com. The Building Provincetown book is available for purchase ($20) at Town Hall, Office of the Town Clerk, 260 Commercial Street, Provincetown 02657.

9 Miller Hill Road

9 Miller Hill Road, Provincetown (2010), by David W. Dunlap. 
"Charles Webster Hawthorne," by Albin Polasek (1932), Provincetown Art Association and Museum. Photograph (2012), by David W. Dunlap.Hawthorne house

Two significant properties on Miller Hill are connected with the painter Charles W. Hawthorne (1872-1930), who is credited — above all others — with having been the force of nature responsible for the transformation of Provincetown into an artists’ colony in the early 20th century. There is his barnlike class studio building, which still stands at 25 Miller Hill Road, and this structure — also gambrel-roofed — that was the home he shared with his wife, Marion Campbell Hawthorne (d 1945), a respected painter in her own right, and their son Joseph “Jo” Hawthorne (d 1994), an accomplished conductor nationally in the mid-20th century and the founder, in 1955, of the Provincetown Symphony Society and Provincetown Symphony Orchestra.

9 Miller Hill Road, Provincetown (±1927). Scrapbooks of Althea Boxell: Book 1, Page 29. Courtesy of the Provincetown History Preservation Project (Dowd Collection). 

More pictures and history»

14 Miller Hill Road

No picture yetLaurel and Vincent Guadazno, Provincetown, by David W. Dunlap.Until 1966, this was home to the Viera family, including Mary Fratus (Perry) Viera (±1865-1937), who was born on Pico in the Azores; and her children Frank Joseph Viera Jr., a maintenance man, and Joseph Viera, who worked at a sand company, and their sister, Eugenia L. (Viera) Elliot, who worked at the New York Store for more than 45 years and sold the house in 1966 to Edward and Ella Lindsay. The property was purchased in 1977 by Laurel K. Guadazno (b 1947), who shares it with her husband, Vincent Guadazno (b 1942). The Guadaznos routinely touch the lives of almost every resident and visitor. Laurel, an alumna of the Vermont College of Fine Arts, is a longtime staff member at the Pilgrim Monument and Provincetown Museum. More history»

18 Miller Hill Road

18 Miller Hill Road, Provincetown (2008), by David W. Dunlap.Milhil Condominium

In 2012, 45 percent of the full-time residents on Miller Hill Road lived in one single property: the 13-unit Milhil Condominium complex, constructed in 1984. The mean age is 60 here; the median is 59. Residents include Peter N. Edmonds (b 1946), proprietor of the dependably imaginative Mad as a Hatter hat store at 360 Commercial Street. More information»