4 Shank Painter Road

4 Shank Painter Road, Provincetown (2011), by David W. Dunlap.4 Shank Painter Road Condominium

Easy to overlook on the way to the Stop & Shop, this house was once the property of James J. Perry, proprietor of the James J. Perry & Son plumbing business, around the corner on Bradford Street. “Son” was James H. Perry (±1914-1955), who inherited a share of this property, which was passed on to his brother, Eugene, after James’s death at an early age. It was converted into a three-unit condo in 2001 by Cassandra “Cass” Benson and Mary Alice Wells, who are proprietors of the Long Point View House, 6 Johnson Street. Benson also opened the Harbor Lounge, 359 Commercial Street, and redeveloped the Gull’s Nest Inn at 6 Sandy Hill Lane. More information»

9 Shank Painter Road

9 Shank Painter Road, Provincetown (2011), by David W. Dunlap. 
9 Shank Painter Road, Provincetown (2008)-02F. A. Days & Sons

Christopher E. Enos, the owner and president of Days Propane, says on the company’s Web site that it has been serving the lower Cape for more than 40 years. But the company name has an even richer tradition, going back more than a century to 1911, when Frank A. Days Jr. (1849-1937), who had arrived from the Azores at age 18, established a contracting and construction supply company at 24 Pearl Street. With the addition of inexpensive artists’ studios to the complex in 1914, the Days lumberyard became renowned in cultural circles. It is now the Fine Arts Work Center. • MapAssessor’s Online Database PDF ¶ Posted 2013-08-29

15 Shank Painter Road

15 Shank Painter Road, Provincetown (2011), by David W. Dunlap.Prestige Dry Cleaners

It is much easier in Provincetown to buy original artwork or watch whales than it is to get your clothes cleaned. Prestige is one of the very few places where that’s possible. The property is owned by Christopher E. Enos, the proprietor and president of Days Propane, next door at 9 Shank Painter Road, through Blue Sunshine Realty. • MapAssessor’s Online Database PDF ¶ Posted 2013-08-29

20 Shank Painter Road

20 Shank Painter Road, Provincetown (2009), by David W. Dunlap. 
20 Shank Painter Road, Provincetown (2012), by David W. Dunlap.Provincetown United Methodist Church

“Is God dead?” was the question posed by Time magazine in 1966. The answer could have been: “If He’s still alive, he sure isn’t paying much attention to the architecture being committed in His name.” The general descent in quality of religious buildings in the West after World War II reflected the trauma their builders had just endured; a conflict that left even the faithful with many doubts. Rather than try to inspire awe or mystery or rapture, post-war houses of worship seemed content to take their cues from stripped-down residential and commercial buildings.

In that context, the Methodist church designed by Donaldson Ray McMullin Associates of Cambridge (that’s one man’s name, not a three-person firm), built from 1958 to 1960, was a remarkable achievement. Its compelling nave, with arresting redwood parquetry and steeply-pitched, exposed roof beams, tends very much to direct one’s eyes and thoughts upward, while exuding warmth and a connection with the natural world and to the craft of boat building.

20 Shank Painter Road, Provincetown (2008), by David W. Dunlap. 

More pictures and history»

25 Shank Painter Road

25 Shank Painter Road, Provincetown (2011), by David W. Dunlap.Engine 1 (also designated Engine 190) went into service in 2002. [Link] 

25 Shank Painter Road, Provincetown (2011), by David W. Dunlap.Provincetown Fire Department Headquarters

With the construction in 1993-1994 of a new four-bay fire house and adjacent headquarters building, the Provincetown Fire Department — one of only two volunteer departments on Cape Cod — consolidated operations from three different locations in the West End and downtown: Pumper House No. 1, 117 Commercial Street (now a private home); Pumper House No. 2, 189 Commercial Street (now a public restroom); and Pumper House No. 3, the former headquarters, at 254 Commercial Street (now a kind of all-purpose streetfront public space).

25 Shank Painter Road, Provincetown (2010), by David W. Dunlap.Ladder 2 (192) of 2009 [Link] and Engine 3 (193) of 2003 [Link]. 

More pictures and history»

26 Shank Painter Road

26 Shank Painter Road, Provincetown (2010), by David W. Dunlap. 
26 Shank Painter Road, Provincetown (2008), by David W. Dunlap.Provincetown Police Department Headquarters

In 2013, the people of Provincetown were having a hard time agreeing on anything regarding the Police Department. But it seemed to be generally acknowledged that a former funeral home, dating to 1975, had long since outlived its usefulness as police headquarters after 29 years of wear, tear, ad hoc repair and constant overstuffing. Just what the answer would be — a rebuilt station on this site, or a new station downtown or at 24 Race Point Road — remained elusive as this was being written. Chief Jeff Jaran had taken the remarkable step in 2012 of personally documenting many of the station’s most glaring deficiencies in a 25-minute video called Police Station Tour, introduced by Town Manager Sharon Lynn. It was difficult to watch it and conclude that everything was just fine as is.

"Police Station Tour," by Provincetown Community TV. On Vimeo.Police Chief Jeff Jaran in the dispatch room, on a video tour. [Link] 

More pictures an